A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America: With a View to the Improvement of Country Residences

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Wiley and Putnam, 1844 - Landscape gardening - 497 pages
 

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Page 145 - There is no instance of a man before Gibbons who gave to wood the loose and airy lightness of flowers, and chained together the various productions of the elements with a free disorder natural to each species.
Page 378 - ... throw in a semblance of green summer to cheer the fire-side : all these bespeak the influence of taste, flowing down from high sources, and pervading the lowest levels of the public mind. If ever Love, as poets sing, delights to visit a cottage, it must be the cottage of an English peasant.
Page 19 - St. George in box : his arm scarce long enough, but will be in a condition to stick the dragon by next April. A green dragon of the same, with a tail of ground-ivy for the present.
Page 388 - All things to man's delightful use: the roof Of thickest covert, was inwoven shade, Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side Acanthus and each odorous bushy shrub Fenced up the verdant wall, each beauteous flower, Iris all hues, roses, and jessamine, Reared high their flourished heads between, and wrought Mosaic; under foot the violet, Crocus, and hyacinth with rich inlay Broidered the ground, more coloured than with stone Of costliest emblem: other creature...
Page 150 - ... barren spot to me ! Spare, woodman, spare the beechen tree ! Though bush or floweret never grow My dark unwarming shade below ; Nor summer bud perfume the dew Of rosy blush, or yellow hue ; Nor fruits of autumn, blossom-born, My green and glossy leaves adorn ; Nor murmuring tribes from me derive Th...
Page 377 - ... Vast lawns that extend like sheets of vivid green, with here and there clumps of gigantic trees, heaping up rich piles of foliage ; the solemn pomp of groves and woodland glades, with the deer trooping in silent herds across them ; the hare bounding away to the covert or the pheasant suddenly bursting upon the wing ; the brook, taught to wind in...
Page 376 - The taste of the English in the cultivation of land and in what is called landscape gardening is unrivalled. They have studied Nature intently, and discover an exquisite sense of her beautiful forms and harmonious combinations. Those charms which in other countries she lavishes in wild solitudes are here assembled round the haunts of domestic life.
Page 376 - Nothing can be more imposing than the magnificence of English park scenery. Vast lawns that extend like sheets of vivid green, with here and there clumps of gigantic trees heaping up rich piles of foliage; the solemn pomp of groves and woodland glades with the deer trooping in silent herds across them...
Page 214 - Lay a garland on my hearse Of the dismal yew ; Maidens, willow branches bear, Say I died true. My love was false, but I was firm, From my hour of birth; Upon my buried body lie Lightly, gentle earth...
Page 150 - Th' ambrosial amber of the hive ; Yet leave this barren spot to me : Spare, woodman, spare the beechen tree ! Thrice twenty summers I have seen The sky grow bright, the forest green ; And many a wintry wind have stood...

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