Page images
PDF
EPUB

In February, 1836, in consequence of increasing age and infirmities, I resigned my situation as Chairman of the Superintending Committee, and their thanks were returned to me for my services, as will be found, with my answer, in the Miscellaneous Part, No. 6.

In consequence of the great increase of the business of this Institution, the Committee purchased the lease of the house adjoining, pulled it down and rebuilt the same, having a new lease, for a longer term, granted by the City. Since its first establishment, in 1816, to 20th November, 1837, during a period of 21 years, there has been received, including interest .. £2,609,640 0 4 Deducting payments to depositors, in

cluding interest and disbursements 2,053,853 3 2

Leaving the sum of £555,786 17 2

due to 25,010 depositors.

I was also on the Committee of the Society for the Refuge for the Destitute, and for the Society of Friends for the Relief of Foreigners in Distress. I resigned my situation as Treasurer to the latter in 1829, after holding it for twenty-one years, when I received a letter of thanks from the Committee. I also belonged to the Marine Society and Merchant Seamen's Office.

From connexions and friends in America I became acquainted with many of the distinguished and literary characters of that country, and from their kindness I have been made an honorary member of the American Philosophical Society at Philadelphia, and of the Philosophical and Historical Societies at New York. I was likewise a member of a Committee for the relief of British prisoners in France, for whom a liberal subscription was raised. The money was transmitted, at various times, to a Committee of respectable officers and others, who were prisoners there, to be distributed in such a manner as should be found most advantageous. Regular returns of the application of the money were made to the Committee in London.

The New England Corporation for civilizing the Indians in New England and parts adjacent is one of which I am also a member. I became a member of this Company many years ago, and succeeded Sir William Pepperell, Bart. as Governor, which office I resigned in 1829, still retaining my situation as a member of the Company, and continuing upon their Committees.

After New England became independent by the American revolution, the field of operations for the Company was, by a decree of the Lord Chancellor, transferred to the British colonies adjacent to New England.

The first operations of the Company, after this decree took place, were in New Brunswick ; but not meeting with the success they anticipated, they removed their establishment to Upper Canada, where it is principally confined to the Indians of the Six Nations upon the Grand River, consisting of the Mohawks and other tribes, who had removed from New England and the parts adjacent.

A portion of the funds under the Company's directions is applicable to the advancement of the Christian religion among Indians, Blacks, and Pagans in some more of His Majesty's plantations or colonies; and they have devoted a part of them, with some success, to the

one

or

instruction of the negroes in Jamaica and other British islands in the West Indies.

I have been for many years a fellow of the Royal Society, and a member of the Royal and London Institutions from their commencement.

I have been a governor of St. Thomas's Hospital, and on its Committees for many years.

I was many years, and still remain, a governor of Christ's Hospital, an Institution established by Edward VI. of great public utility, where many of our distinguished characters have been educated. It gave me much pleasure to promote the objects of Professor A. D. Bache, of Philadelphia, a great grandson of Franklin, the President of Girard College for Orphans, founded and endowed by the late Stephen Girard, a wealthy citizen of Philadelphia. The Professor came to Europe to inspect such public establishments as were conducive to the carrying this great scheme into effect. He had free access to Christ's Hospital, and was much gratified to see those objects that promoted his views.

I was made an honorary member of the Society of Civil Engineers at the time the docks for London were in contemplation and execution. I have belonged to many literary and charitable institutions which are not adverted to ; and it may now be time to conclude this digression.

I have been placed in many situations where I have endeavoured to make myself useful, and been blessed with many friendships and attachments, and my wishes now induce me to decrease my occupations; and I have found, from experience, that contentment forms a large portion of the happiness of human life ; which

is confirmed by what Mrs. Barbauld says, (whom I became acquainted with early in life,) who shews that, by moderating our wishes we may lessen many of our imaginary wants and evils; and I now seek, during the remainder of my life, for ease and retirement, and I look forward with a humble hope that I may hereafter be transferred to a better and happier state.

September 22, 1838.

Part Second.

R E MARKS

ON THE

STATE OF THE PORT OF LONDON IN 1793 ;

WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE

RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE DOCKS

AND OTHER IMPROVEMENTS UP TO THE YEAR 1837 ;

WITH

A FEW HINTS AND OBSERVATIONS

ON THE

COMMERCE AND PROSPERITY OF ENGLAND.

« PreviousContinue »