Towards a History of Consciousness: Space, Time, and Death

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Peter Lang, 2006 - Philosophy - 606 pages
Towards a History of Consciousness: Space, Time, and Death offers a cogent and compelling discussion of the neglected topic of the history of consciousness. An analysis of our postmodern ontology reveals deep but neglected roots. What are those roots and how did they grow? Is there a self without consciousness? What is the relation of the self to the individual? Does the recognition of death contribute to the growth of consciousness? As a survey of western history, this work pushes the boundaries of the understanding of consciousness in intriguing and sometimes provocative directions. This integrative study is intended for the serious, curious student and thinker.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Beginnings PreHistory to Antiquity
9
Medieval Persistence of Classical Antiquity
53
The Renaissance Altered Space and Time
95
The Reformation of Early Modernity
137
Scientific Revolution and Detachment
179
Descartes and Consciousness
223
John Locke and the Language of Consciousness
267
The Fractured Age Twentieth Century Transformation
401
A Time and Space for Consciousness
445
QuasiEssentialistic Characterizations
495
Contrastive Terms
497
CrossReferences
499
Notes
505
Bibliography
555
Index
587

Enlightenment and the Birth of Modernity
309
Modernity and Beyond
355

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About the author (2006)

The Author: Vwadek P. Marciniak received his master's degree in political philosophy from Columbia University and his doctorate in early modern intellectual history from the University of Missouri. Under the name of Dick Martin, he taught in the Humanities Department at Michigan State University (1966-1992) where he also aided in the creation of the Whole Works and Contemporary Humanities programs as well as a course on England during the Enlightenment.

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