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Who slew her husband, overseer of home.
Should he have equal votes, it follows then,
Orestes is absolved. What wait we for?
Tellers, to whom this task has been assigned,
Turn out at once the ballots from the urns.

Ores. Phæbus Apollo! What is the result ?
Chor. Oh Night! dark mother! dost thou see these doings ?

Ores. Now ! now! for me to perish by the noose,
Or else to look upon the blessed light!

Chor. Now! now! for me to suffer worst eclipse, Or henceforth hold my office unabridged.

[The ballots are turned out and counted, Apollo. Correctly, strangers, number out the votes, And with impartial justice ; for great harm Doth often from the loss of one accrue; One doth o'erthrow, or raise a family. Ath. He is acquitted—for the votes are equal.

[She gives her ballot in favour of ORESTES. Ores. Oh Pallas! thou that hast preserved my house, And me, sad outcast from my father-land, Hast to my home restored. Some Greek will say, He is again an Argive, and he dwells Secure in his hereditary state, By means of Pallas and of Loxias, And the third Saviour, who doth sway all thingsHe that respects the father's privilege, And doth preserve me now, beholding these, Appellants fell! my mother's advocates. But to this country and thy citizens I bind myself and my posterity, By solemn oath, for all hereafter time, That never chief, with well-appointed troops Shall, from my land, with hostile aim, come here. For I, myself, then being in the tomb, Will bring repentance for their bootless toils On those that violate my present oath, Discouraging their inauspicious paths With misadventures, and with omens dire Their passage over streams. But if they act With righteousness, and honour evermore The city of Pallas, and are allies true, I will regard them more benignantly. Farewell, thou and thy prople; may they bruise Their foes with an inevitable fall, And for themselves obtain deliverance, And wished-for, honourable victory!

[Exit ORESTES. CHORUS. Ye younger gods have trampled down Old laws, and wrested them from me; Amerced of office and renown, I will, for this indignity, Drop from my heart's wrath-bleeding wound A blight-a plague-drop on the ground. A lichen, fatal to the trees, To children, shall invade the soil, (Hear, Justice!) and inflict disease On men—the blotch and deadly boil. Ah! shall I groan? what shall I do? What will become of me? These citizens have made me rue The worst indignity.

Daughters of Night! deep-injured, deep-resenting,
And for your degradation, deep-lamenting.

Ath. Let me prevail on you-take not this grief
Too much to heart; ye suffered not defeat.
The votes were equal, and the judgment fair,
Nor was to thy dishonour. E'en from Zeus
A clear convincing testimony came ;
Who gave the oracle was witness too
That this Orestes should incur no scathe
For what he did. Hurl not your bolts of wrath
Against this land, nor cause unfruitfulness,
By letting fall the drops of deities,
To blast the seed, a blight of rottenness.
For I do promise you most faithfully,
That ye at altars, having splendid seats,
Shall sit, and own in perpetuity
The secret places of this goodly land,
And be much honoured by these citizens.

Chorus.
Ye younger gods have trampled down
Old laws, and wrested them from me;
Amerced of office and renown,
I will, for this indignity,
Drop from my heart's wrath-bleeding wound
A blight--a plague-drop on the ground.
A lichen, fatal to the trees,
To children, shall invade the soil,
(Hear, Justice !) and inflict disease
On men-

--the blotch and deadly boil.
Ah, shall I groan? what shall I do?
What will become of me?
These citizens have made me rue
The worst indignity.
Daughters of night! deep-injured, deep-resenting,
And, for your degradation, deep-lamenting.

Ath. Ye are not dishonour'd; with excess of wrath Mar not man's earth with wounds-incurable. I too rely on Zeus, and of the Gods What need to say it? none but only I Have knowledge of the keys of that dread vault, Wherein sealed up he keeps his thunderboltBut there's no need of it. Be well advised, Nor cast forth on the ground the rash tongue's fruit, That, where it falls, is mildew of all good. Lull the sharp gust of thy tempestuous wrath, And be my honoured fellow resident ; Having the first-fruits of this spacious land, And offerings for hopes of progeny, And consummation of the marriage rites. Thou shalt for ever praise this good advice.

CHORUS.
That I should suffer this ! in age
Dishonoured, unavenged! oh rage-
I breathe it forth.
Oh earth! oh earth!
What pain is this that pricks my side?
Hear my sharp passion, mother Night!
From me, with many a guileful sleight,
These gods, who rob me and deride,

As though 'twere nothing, at their ease,

Have ta'en my public offices.
Ath. I put up with thy wrath ; thou wiser art
As older, than I am-yet unto me
Not scantily Zeus the boon of wisdom gave.
At other land, of other tribes arrived,
When 'tis too late, ye will be fond of this;
Thereof I give you warning: time, that flows
Still onward, in his flowing stream, shall bring
Increase of honour for these citizens.
And near the palace of Erectheus, thou
Shalt here obtain an honourable seat,
And shalt such acceptable worship find
From troops of women, and from bands of men,
As no where else in all the world beside.
But cast not on this country bane of blood,
Exciting into rage youth's fiery mood,
Frantic with furious heats not raised by wine:
Nor vexing, as it were, the heart of cocks,
Stir ’mid my citizens intestine War,
That is against his neighbour over-bold.
Let there be foreign war. Ay! let it come,
And welcome—that wherein a passionate love
Of glory shall be shown; but for the fight
Of the domestic bird—I'll none of it.
Such choice is thine to make and to obtain,
Good doing, good receiving, to possess
A lot and part in this land loved of Gods.

CHORUS.
That I should suffer this ! in age,
Dishonoured, unavenged! oh ragem
I breathe forth.
Oh earth! oh earth !
What pain

this that pricks my side?
Hear my sharp passion, mother Night!
From me, with many a guileful sleight,
These gods, who rob me and deride,
As though 'twere nothing, at their ease,

Have ta'en my public offices.
Ath. I will not yet be weary

of my

tale
Of thy advantages—if thou wilt stay.
Thou shalt not say that thou, a goddess old,
By me, a younger, and these citizens
Wert driven from hence-inhospitably driven.
If holy to thy apprehension seems
Persuasion, speaking softly by my voice,
Thou wilt remain ; if thou wilt not remain,
'Twill be unjust to bring upon this people
Thy wrathful fury, indignation, scathe.
'Tis in thy power, an honoured settler here,
To have due worship paid thee evermore.

Chor. What seat, pray, queen Athena, shall I have ?
Ath. One free from all affliction—take it thou.
Chor. Suppose I do, what honour shall be mine?
Ath. That without thee not any house shall thrive.
Chor. Wilt thou effect that I shall have this power ?
Ath. I'll make all right for him who does thee right.
Chor. And wilt thou pledge thyself for all time hence ?
Ath. What I have promised, that I must perform.
Chor. I am nigh soothed, and stand apart from wrath.
Ath. Friends upon earth thou likewise shalt obtain.

Chor. What blessing shall I call upon thy people ?

Ath. Whatever has respect to victory,
That is not mischievous ; and this from earth,
And from the sea-dew, and the heavens above,
That the mild breathings of the winds may come,
While the bright sun shines clearly, o'er the land;
That earth's fruit and increase of animals
May ever for my citizens abound
In due succession ; also that there be
No blight of the unborn of human kind.
But with all evil-doers be as fierce
As the case needs. For, like a husbandman,
My sole affection I reserve for those
That bear good fruit, so that the just may be
Exempt from sorrow. Let this be thy part.
It shall be mine to give them high renown-
I could not bear to have it otherwise-
In bold achievements and exploits of war.

CHORUS.
I will accept a dwelling-place
With Pallas, nor will I disgrace
With aught of ill a city, where
The mightiest Zeus and Mars appear,
As in a sacred bulwark dwelling,
The bulwark of the Grecian gods :
But I with power all spells excelling
A blessing call on these abodes.
Let the sun's clear-shining light
Make to spring from out the earth,
Bloom of gladness to the sight,

Every sort of happy birth.
Ath. With good will for my people, settling here
These mighty goddesses, of mood severe,
I soothed and reconciled them : theirs the charge
To exercise control o'er men at large.
Happy who feels them not, he nothing knows
Of life's worst bitterness and sharpest woes.
But from the sires, who grievously offend,
The curse of sin doth to their sons descend ;
When life and life's delights the fond man calls
His own, and boasts—the silent ruin falls.

CHORUS.
Let there be no blight of trees,
For the buds no scorching blast ;
Never by the black disease
Be the landmarks overpast.

Let the flocks increase in season,
And with twin births ever go;
And the people, as is reason,
Praise the gods who bless them 80.

Ath. Hear ye what gifts she doth in fact dispen
For mighty is the mystic influence
Of dread Érinnys, both within the portals
Of Hades, and among the blest Immortals.
She doth discharge her ministry assigned
With most effectual power among mankind;
Some with a life of joyful song she cheers ;
To some she gives a life bedimmed with tears.

CHORUS.
I forbid untimely doom-
Let the virgins in their bloom
Be to fitting partners wed:
Look to this, my sisters dread,
Fates ! whom my own mother bore,
Ye, who claim the lordship o'er
Men's affairs in all their course,
And from whom, as from their source,
All their blessings ever flow,

All the good the righteous know.
Ath. Hearing these friendly blessings I rejoice,
And love Persuasion's eyes, who tuned my voice,
Enabling me to turn their wrath aside,
When they had fiercely my request denied.
But Zeus prevails : the power of Mercy still
Predominates-good doth o'ermaster ill.

CHORUS.
Here let Faction never roar,
Which no mischiefs e'er can sate;
Let the dust not drink the gore
Shed by fierce intestine hate :
Let them love as brethren should,
And one hatred only know;
Let them love the common good,
Let them hate the common foe.

Ath. Has she not now the way of blessing found?
Much good shall to my people hence redound.
Pay ye these awful goddesses the meed
Of honour due, and through your lives succeed :
So shall they ever keep the just in sight,
And crown with blessing those who do the right.

CHORUS.
Rejoice ye in your wealth profuse,
And in the sheltering power of Zeus,
All
ye

that sit his shadow near,
Beloved of his Daughter dear ;
For those she shelters with her wing,
Find favour with the awful King.

[Athena stations herself at the head of the Chorus in t

orchestra, where they are joined by the Escort of Fea

males with torches.
Ath. Rejoice ye likewise : I your way must show :
Now by the light of these attendants go ;
And while the victims bleed, descend, descend !
Bless ye my people, and from ill defend.
Lead ye, my friends, these settlers to their seat?
And yours, my citizens, be good complete !

CHORUS.
All ye that in the city of Pallas dwell,
Ye gods and mortals, once again, farewell i
If with well-doing ye my place respect,
I your well-being never will neglect.

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