Hume: An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding: And Other Writings

Front Cover
Stephen Buckle
Cambridge University Press, Feb 15, 2007 - Philosophy - 278 pages
David Hume's An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, first published in 1748, is a concise statement of Hume's central philosophical positions. It develops an account of human mental functioning which emphasizes the limits of human knowledge and the extent of our reliance on (non-rational) mental habits. It then applies that account to questions of free will and religious knowledge before closing with a defence of moderate scepticism. This volume, which presents a modified version of the definitive 1772 edition of the work, offers helpful annotation for the student reader, together with an introduction that sets this profoundly influential work in its philosophical and historical contexts. The volume also includes a selection of other works by Hume that throw light on both the circumstances of the work's genesis and its key themes and arguments.
 

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Contents

Of the dierent species of philosophy
3
Of the origin of ideas
14
Of the association of ideas
19
Sceptical doubts concerning the operations of
28
Sceptical solution of these doubts
41
Of probabilitya
54
Of the idea of necessaryconnexion
57
Of liberty and necessity
73
Of a particular providence and of a future state1
117
Of the academical or sceptical philosophy
131
A Letter from aGentleman to hisFriend in
147
TheSceptic1
163
Of Suicide
181
Of theImmortality of theSoul
190
Thumbnail biographies
198
Selections from Humes letters
203

Of the reason of animals
92
10
96
My Own Life
215

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About the author (2007)

Stephen Buckle is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the Australian Catholic University.

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