Epigrams: original and selected [by B. Standring.].

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Simpkin, Marshall, 1877 - Epigrams, English - 113 pages
 

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Page 45 - TOO late I stayed, forgive the crime, — Unheeded flew the hours; How noiseless falls the foot of Time That only treads on flowers!
Page 19 - How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds Makes ill deeds done...
Page 37 - On parent knees, a naked new-born child Weeping thou sat'st while all around thee smiled ; So live, that sinking in thy last long sleep, Calm thou mayst smile, while all around thee weep.
Page 12 - In all thy humours, whether grave or mellow, Thou'rt such a touchy, testy, pleasant fellow ; Hast so much wit, and mirth, and spleen about thee, There is no living with thee, nor without thee.
Page 89 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Page 11 - Life ! we've been long together Through pleasant and through cloudy weather; 'Tis hard. to part when friends are dear — Perhaps 'twill cost a sigh, a tear; — Then steal away, give little warning, Choose thine own time; Say not Good Night, — but in some brighter clime Bid me Good Morning.
Page 49 - Tis your chief wish, you say : Come on ; I'll shew thee, friend, the certain way. If to no feasts abroad thou lov'st to go, Whilst bounteous God does bread at home bestow ; If thou the goodness of thy clothes dost prize By thine own use, and not by others' eyes ; If (only safe from weathers) thou can'st dwell In a small house, but a convenient shell ; If thou, without a sigh, or golden wish, Canst look upon thy beechen bowl, and dish ; If in thy mind such power and greatness be, The Persian king's...
Page 84 - TALK of war with a Briton, he'll boldly advance, That one English soldier will beat ten of France ; Would we alter the boast from the sword to the pen, Our odds are still greater, still greater our men : In the deep mines of science though Frenchmen may toil, Can their strength be...
Page 111 - T'other day, much in want of a subject for song, Thinks I to myself, I have hit on a strain, Sure marriage is much like a Devonshire lane.
Page 9 - This picture, placed these busts between, Gives satire all its strength : Wisdom and Wit are little seen, But Folly at full length.

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