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The plot of the Fortunate Shepherdess, to which Dr. Beattie hints some exception might be taken by a nice critic, is certainly by no means pleasing. Ambition triumphs over the affections of the heart; and the humble, yet sincere lover, is discarded for a rival, whose chief recommendation is his wealth. But in the progress of the tale, there are beauties developed, which would justify even a warmer eulogium than Dr. B. has pronounced upon the work." The celebrated Dr. Blacklock," says Dr. Irving, " as I have learnt from one of his pupils, regarded it as equal to the pastoral comedy of Ramsay." And Mr. Pinkerton, who unfortunately could see nothing in the Gentle Shepherd to entitle it to a place among good compositions, says of Ross :-"Some of the descriptions are exquisitely natural and fine. The language and thoughts are more truly pastoral than any I have yet found in any poet, save Theocritus."

The songs published along with the Fortunate Shepherdess, include some which have not only, as Dr. B. remarks, been long known to the people of Angus, Mearns, and Aberdeenshire, but are very general favorites in Scotland; "The rock and the wee pickle tow;"" Married and woo'd and a';" "The bride's breast knot ;" &c. There are also several songs interspersed through the poem itself; and one which is very pleasing in the third canto, entitled the "Braes of Flaviana." It is to the tune of the Lass of Patie's Mill.

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An' that a thousand ways;
Best on the pipe he plays,
Is merry, blyth, an' gay,
An' Jeany fair,' he says,
'Has stown my heart away.

"

Had I ten thousand pounds,
I'd all to Jeany gee,

I'd thole a thousand wounds
To keep my Jeany free :
For Jeany is to me,
Of all the maidens fair,
My jo, and ay shall be,
With her I'll only pair.

Of roses I will weave
For her a flow'ry crown,
All other cares I'll leave,
An' busk her haffets round;
I'll buy her a new gown,
Wi' strips of red an' blew,
An' never mair look brown,
For Jeany'll ay be new.

My Jeany made reply ;
Syn ye ha'e chosen me,
Then all my wits I'll try,
A loving wife to be.
If I my Colin see,
I'll lang for naething mair,
Wi' him I do agree

In weal an' wae to share.'

gh the "Fortunate Shepherdess" was re

The plot of the Fortunate Shepherdess, to which Dr. Beattie hints some exception might be taken by a nice critic, is certainly by no means pleasing. Ambition triumphs over the affections of the heart; and the humble, yet sincere lover, is discarded for a rival, whose chief recommendation is his wealth. But in the progress of the tale, there are beauties developed, which would justify even a warmer eulogium than Dr. B. has pronounced upon the work. "The celebrated Dr. Blacklock," says Dr. Irving, "as I have learnt from one of his pupils, regarded it as equal to the pastoral comedy of Ramsay." And Mr. Pinkerton, who unfortunately could see nothing in the Gentle Shepherd to entitle it to a place among good compositions, says of Ross :-"Some of the descriptions are exquisitely natural and fine. The language and thoughts are more truly pastoral than any I have yet found in any poet, save Theocritus."

The songs published along with the Fortunate Shepherdess, include some which have not only, as Dr. B. remarks, been long known to the people of Angus, Mearns, and Aberdeenshire, but are very general favorites in Scotland; "The rock and the wee pickle tow;" "Married and woo'd and a';" "The bride's breast knot ;" &c. There are also several songs interspersed through the poem itself; and one which is very pleasing in the third canto, entitled the "Braes of Flaviana." It is to the tune of the Lass of Patie's Mill.

Of all the lads that be
On Flaviana's braes,
'Tis Colin bears the gree,

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