A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: A midsummer night's dreame. 1895

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1895
 

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Page 221 - The best in this kind are but shadows ; and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend them.
Page 321 - But all the story of the night told over, And all their minds transfigured so together, More witnesseth than fancy's images, And grows to something of great constancy ; But, howsoever, strange and admirable.
Page 311 - Dream, which I had never seen before, nor shall ever again, for it is the most insipid ridiculous play that ever I saw in my life.
Page 155 - O spirit of love, how quick and fresh art thou, That, notwithstanding thy capacity Receiveth as the sea, nought enters there, Of what validity and pitch soe'er, But falls into abatement and low price, Even in a minute; so full of shapes is fancy, That it alone is high fantastical.
Page xxiii - Jil, and Jin, Tit and Nit, and Wap, and Win : The train that wait upon her. Upon a grasshopper they got, And, what with amble and with trot, For hedge nor ditch they spared not, But after her they hie them. A cobweb over them they throw, To shield the wind if it should blow, Themselves they wisely could bestow, Lest any should espy them.
Page 99 - Flying between the cold moon and the earth, Cupid all arm'd : a certain aim he took At a fair vestal throned by the west, And loosed his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts ; But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watery moon, And the imperial votaress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Page 98 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid, on a dolphin's back, Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song ; And certain stars shot madly from their spheres. To hear the sea-maid's music.
Page 48 - O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings...
Page 306 - Thro' bogs, thro' brakes ; Or else, unseene, with them I go, All in the nicke To play some tricke And frolicke it, with ho, ho, ho ! Sometimes I meete them like a man, Sometimes an ox, sometimes a hound ; And to a horse I turn me can, To trip and trot about them round. But if to ride, My backe they stride, More swift than wind away I go ; Ore hedge and lands, Thro...
Page 308 - Thus nightly revell'd to and fro ; And for my pranks men call me by The name of Robin Good-fellow.

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