Harrison's British Classicks, Volume 5

Front Cover
Harrison and Company, 1785
 

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Contents

The Difficulty of forming Confederacies
117
Obligations to Secrecy critically ſtated
119
A Parallel between Alexander and a Highwayman
121
How far the Precept to love our Enemies is practicable
124
Parallel between Ancient and Modern Learning
126
On Lying
129
Tranſlation of a Manuſcript of Longinus lately diſcovered contain ing a Compariſon of celebrated Paſſages in Pagan and Jewiſh Writers
131
Diſtreſſes of an Author invited to read his Play
133
LIN Miſargyruss Account of his Companions in the Fleet
137
The Fatal Effects of Falſe Apologies and Pretences a Story
139
The Story continued
144
Tranſlation of the Manuſcript of Longinus concluded
146
Preſumption of Modern Criticiſm cenſured Ancient Poetry ne ceſſarily obſcure Examples from Horace
149
Poets not univerſally or neceſſarily Poor IS1 1x Satans Letter in Behalf of Religion and Virtue
154
Mifargyruss Account of his Companions concluded
159
Paucity of Original Writers Pallages which Pope has borrowed pointed out
163
The Hero diſtinguiſhed from the Modern Man of Honour Ac count of Eugenio by Benevolus
164
Benevoluss Letter continued
166
Benevoluss Letter concluded
169
On the Trades of London
171
Human Sports not ſuch as can gratify pure Benevolence Fro lics unlawful becauſe dangerous A Fatal one related
173
Idle Hope
176
Sequel to the Story of Eugenio Not accepting a Challenge de clared honourable by the Articles of War
179
Lxxr Letters from Six Charallers
183
The Folly of human Wiſhes and Schemes to correct the Moral Government of the World The Hiſtory of Nouraddin and Amana
185
The Hiſtory of Nouraddin and Amana concluded
188
Apology for neglecting oflicious Advice
190
Obſervations on the Odyſſey of Homer
193
NUMB Page Fidelia
198
LXXVII The Miſchiefs of Superſtition and Infidelity The Hiſtory of LXXVII The Hiſtory of Fidelia continued
201
The Hiſtory of Fidelia concluded
205
Obferyations on the Odyſſey continued
209
Incitement to Enterprize and Emulation Some Account of the Admirable Crichton
211
Perſonal Beauty produced by Moral Sentiment
214
LXXXIIĮ Obſervations on the Odyſſey concluded
216
Coach
218
Folly of falſe Pretences to Importance A Journey in a Stage LXXXV Study Compoſition and Converſe equally neceſſary to Intel lectual Accompliſhm...
220
LXXXVI The Life of Agamus an old Debauchee
223
Politeneſs a neceſſary Auxiliary to Knowledge and Virtue
225
nacy of Mr Simon Browne
227
Account of Tim Wildgooſe by Himſelf Project to prevent the Diſappointment of Modern Ambition
251
Projectors injudiciouſly cenſured and applauded
253
the Life of Nomentanus
256
er Blemiſhes in the Paradiſe Loſt
258
Infelicities of Retirement to Men of Buſineſs
261
The Fairy Tale concluded
265
On the Fragments of Menander
268
Inſenſibility of Danger when miſtaken for Courage
271
CVII Different Opinions equally plauſible
273
CVIII The Uncertainty of Human Things
275
A Viſit to Bedlam with Dean Swift a Viſion
278
Pity not an Expreſſion of ſtrong Benevolence
280
The Pleaſures and Advantages of Induſtry
282
Ill Effects of general Familiarity and wanton Rudeneſs
285
Obſervations on Shakeſpeares King Lear
288
an Ealtern Story
290
NUMB PAGE cxxi The Adventures of a Louſe
308
Obfervations on King Lear concluded
315
The Story continued
317
The Story concluded
320
Solitude not eligible
324
In what Arts the Ancients excel the Moderns
326
Men differently employed unjuſtly cenſured by each other
328
Characters at Bath
331
Danger of Relapſe after Purpoſes of Amendment
333
Singularity cenſured
335
Benevolence urged from the Miſery of Solitudes an Eaſtern Story
337
In what Arts the Moderns excel the Ancients
339
Agamuss Account of his Daughter continued
344
Concluded
347
Writers not a uſeleſs Generation 350 N cxxxvIII Their Happineſs and Infelicity
353
The Deſign of the Critical Papers in the Adventurer
355
Account of the general Plan and Concluſion of the Works
357
The Mercy of Afiction an Eaſtern Story 195
195
The Itch of Writing univerſal 293
293
Obfervations on King Lear continued 295
295
EXVII Danger of aſſuining the Appearance of Evil The Story of Deldemona 298
298
The Story of Deſdeniona concluded 301
301
XIX The Folly of creating Inartificial Wants 30+ cxx The Miferies of Life 306
306

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Page 248 - Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Page 178 - The glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength: He goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted ; Neither turneth he back from the sword.
Page 103 - Ye mountains of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither let there be rain, upon you, nor fields of offerings : for there the shield of the mighty is vilely cast away, the shield of Saul, as though he had not been anointed with oil.
Page 131 - I have trodden the winepress alone, and of the people there was none with me : for I will tread them in mine anger, and trample them in my fury, and their blood shall be sprinkled upon my garments, and I will stain all my raiment.
Page 103 - Saul and Jonathan were lovely and pleasant in their lives, and in their death they were not divided: they were swifter than eagles, they were stronger than lions. Ye daughters of Israel, weep over Saul, who clothed you in scarlet with other delights, who put on ornaments of gold upon your apparel.
Page 99 - ... force : but yet I know not, whe.ther my danger is a reality or a dream. I am as thou art, a reptile of the earth ; my life is a moment, and eternity, in which days and years and ages are nothing, eternity is before me, for which I also should prepare : but by whom then must the faithful be governed?
Page 259 - I never had any esteem for, are likely to enjoy this world after me. When I reflect what an...
Page 160 - Take of deities, male and female, as many as you can use. Separate them into two equal parts, and keep Jupiter in the middle. Let Juno put him in a ferment, and Venus mollify him. Remember on all occasions to make use of volatile Mercury.
Page 315 - CATo. In the second place, we are to consider those who have mistaken notions of honour. And these are such as establish any thing to themselves for a point of honour which is contrary either to the laws of God, or of their country ; who think it more honourable to revenge than to forgive an injury ; who make no scruple of telling a lie, but would put any man to death that accuses them of it ; who are more careful to guard their reputation by their courage than by their virtue.
Page 129 - Who hath measured the waters in the hollow of his hand, and meted out heaven with a span, and comprehended the dust of the earth in a measure, and weighed the mountains in scales, and the hills in a balance...

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