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" But in the right to eat the bread, without the leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns, he is my equal and the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man. "
THE LIFE AND PUBLIC SERVICES OF HON. ABRAHAM LINCOLN, - Page 221
by D.W. BARTLETT - 1860
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The Land We Live in: Or the Story of Our Country

Henry Mann - United States - 1896 - 336 pages
...right to eat the bread without the leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns, he (the negro) is my equal, and the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man" — was another sterling utterance which struck home to the North. While Lincoln was pleading...
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THE LIFE AND PUBLIC SERVICES OF HON. ABRAHAM LINCOLN, OF ILLINOIS, AND HON ...

1860
...color, perhaps not in moral or intellectual endowments. But in the right to eat the bread, without leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns, he...the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man." Upon a subsequent occasion, when the reason for making a statement like this recurred,...
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The Life and Public Services of Hon. Abraham Lincoln: With a Portrait on ...

David W. Bartlett, Abraham Lincoln - Campaign literature - 1860 - 357 pages
...color, perhaps not in moral or intellectual endowments. But in the right to eat the bread, without leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns, he...the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man." Upon a subsequent occasion, when the reason for making a statement like this recurred,...
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Political Debates Between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas ...

Abraham Lincoln - Lincoln-Douglas Debates, Ill., 1858 - 1860 - 268 pages
...not in moral or intellectual endowments. But in the right to eat the bread, without leave of any body else, which his own hand earns, he is my equal, and...the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man." Upon a subsequent occasion, when the reason for making a statement like this recurred,...
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LIVES AND SPEECHES OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND HANNIBAL HAMLIN

1860
...endowments. But in the right to eat the bread, without leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns, lie is my equal, and the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man." Upon a subsequent occasion, when the reason for making a statement like this recurred,...
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Our Martyr President, Abraham Lincoln: Voices from the Pulpit of New York ...

William R. Williams, Henry Ward Beecher, Henry Whitney Bellows, Stephen Higginson Tyng, Charles Seymour Robinson, William Ives Budington, John McClintock, Abram Newkirk Littlejohn, Theodore Ledyard Cuyler, Joseph Parrish Thompson, James Eells, Elbert Stothoff Porter, Ebenezer Platt Rogers, Samuel Dickinson Burchard, Joel Edson Rockwell, Samuel Thayer Spear, Robert Lowry, Albert Sanford Hunt, William Adams, Henry J. Fox, George Bancroft, Matthew Simpson, Henry Boynton Smith - 1865 - 420 pages
...but little, that little let him enjoy. In the right to eat the bread, without the leave of any body else, which his own hand earns, he is my equal, and...the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man." In his highest prosperity he never forgot his kindred with men. of low estate. Amid all...
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The History of Abraham Lincoln, and the Overthrow of Slavery

Isaac N. Arnold - Dummies (Bookselling) - 1866 - 720 pages
...equal in many respects — certainly not in color, perhaps not in moral or intellectual endowment. But in the right to eat the bread, without the leave...the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man. At Galesburg, October, 1858, he said : The Judge has alluded to the Declaration of Independence,...
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The History of Abraham Lincoln, and the Overthrow of Slavery

Isaac Newton Arnold - Slavery - 1866 - 720 pages
...Intellectual endowment. Hut in the right to eat the bread, without the leave of anybody else, which hi* own hand earns, he Is my equal and the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man. At Galesburg, October, 1858, he said : The Judge has alluded to the Declaration of Independence,...
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The History of Abraham Lincoln, and the Overthrow of Slavery

Isaac N. Arnold - Dummies (Bookselling) - 1866 - 720 pages
...in the right to eat the bread, without the leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns, lie la my equal and the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man. At Gulesburg, October, 1858, he said : The Judge has alluded to the Declaration of Independence,...
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Men of Out Times

Harriet Beecher Stowe - United States - 1868 - 575 pages
...enumerated in the Declaration of Independence — the right of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. In the right to eat the bread without the leave of...Judge Douglas, and the equal of every other man." The same primary granite substratum of moral right, of everlasting justice, underlies all these speeches....
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