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PREFACE.

Why, it may be asked, is another book upon the Evidences of Christianity, published, when so many elaborate and masterly defences of our religion have been given to the world by the great and the learned, both of our own, and of former times? The author replies, that, since the press is daily putting forth, in treatises of various pretension, the opinions and the arguments of the unbeliever, it cannot be obtrusive in a Christian minister to call the attention of his fellow-disciples to some of the leading evidences of our faith. He might, indeed, allege other reasons why he has been induced to venture before the public in this particular, but in these, few, perhaps, would feel any interest.

Again, it may be asked, why not, on this subject, at least, keep off the debatable ground? why introduce doctrinal points into a review of

the evidences of Christianity? The author replies, that, he is of opinion, no impression can be made upon the mind of the unbeliever, unless it can be shown that the Christianity of the scriptures, and the reputed orthodoxy of the professing Christian world are very different things. He conceives that unless it can be shown that the Lord Jesus is a different being from the Father who sent himunless it can be shown, that, instead of being, himself, "God over all blessed for evermore,' he was the chief and most honoured messenger of God:-unless it can be shown that Christ taught the strict and simple unity of God both in practice and in words—and that he gave no countenance to the doctrine of the incarnation of the Godhead, of vicarious suffering, of imputed righteousness, together with other astounding tenets of the reputed orthodox faith, all attempts to convince the unbeliever of the truth of Christianity will be vain. Therefore was the author not careful of avoiding the • debatable ground, whensoever a fair opportunity presented itself for expatiating thereupon. · The author pretends not to have written for the ·learned in Christ,' and 'masters in Israel-but for the youthful, and the inquirer, and the wayfaring man and the poor. With respect to the manner in which he may have executed his task, those into whose hands his book may fall, will

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