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pleasures of life. What have I to do with sorrow, that curse of human nature, which, at the best steals too quickly upon man, Let others flee to the consolation they need; but it shall be my rule to pursue pleasure whensoever I have opportunity,

stordrive away care and mourning to seize the enjoyments of life as they flit-around me. I say, I asko not such a man if there is not something applicableyto the chequered condition of his nature in Christis promise to the mourner-because he feels not the pangs of the mourner, Yøt his state is not the less mournful.rli, What is there, in fact, either in the character or pursuits of the gay flutterers around the vortex of folly and dissipation, but what is calculated to excite melancholy feel (ings Qu How delusive their hopes and transient their enjoyments!! Yea, n ilitoke nositores gusta 3114487 What is humani joy?'a transient beam'?...? 34 Proor moonlight, quiv'ring on the cheoquer'd stream 34:

to Anearly dew-drop, sparkling on the rose; 7)..

BuiA silver cloud, which froliç zephyr blows:,: Priser Therefore it is a melancholy sight to contemplate human beings, practically contemning the conso* lations and duties of religion, given 'up to the pursuit of pleasure, and making vanity the chief Business of life. I såý, I ask 'not such persons, is

there any thing applicable to the condition of man "in the consoling promise of Christ to the mournPer and yet, I might' propound the question tota Marge portion of my fellow-creatures at any hour, 91 and to almost every individual of the human ngáce, ar particular seasons, with the certainty of Féceiving an affirmative answer. The man whose fair prospects in life had vanished, and who was left, aged and helpless, to struggle with adversity, would tell me yes. The victim of hopeless disease would tell me yeso. The widow, bereft of the friend of her youth and the solace of her age, would tell me yeszaj The parent, bending in sorrow over the tomb of bis beloved child, would tell me yes. "Nay, it is the inheritance of man to mourn, therefore is our Lord's promise applicable to man.* Did it fall, indeed, within my present pirpose, or were it possible, in the short compass of a discourse, minutely to examine his precepts, it might be proved, that they agree with the Saviour's declaration, I come not to condemn, but to save the world; it might be shown, that the sum of his exhortations is, « Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your father wbich is in heaven.? Be it our endeavour to show that, independently of these internal marks of truth, Christianity has other species of evidence of the most powerful kind. - The branch to which we shall now direct our attention, is the evidence of testimony at turund

Testimony is a most important means of conveying knowledge... By testimony we learn the history of mankind in past ages, and are assured of the existence of facts which do not come under our own observation. By testimony, we ascertain the nature of things, of which we have had no experience, and the consequences of actions, in wbich we have not been engaged. If we were obliged to gain our knowledge from observation and experience, we should make but a slow pro

gain hot beersequeno we have ascertain

gress in the acquisition of the most common and obvious truiths." We should be placed, intellectually, in çircumstances analogous to infancy, without the means whence infancy could ripen into manhood. All the knowledge that we could attain, during many years of unassisted effort would be but a trivial matter, and might be imparted by testimony in a very short space of time. :

Neither is testimony a less satisfactory, than it is a convenient and copious, source of knowledge. We are not the less convinced that the Roman Empire had an existence, although we were not in being either in the time of its glory or of its dećay: nor that the crusades, which drained Eu. rope of its population and led her children to perish in distant lands, were undertaken, although we did not behold the misery and the destruction consequent thereupon. Comparatively few Eu. ropéans have landed on the shores of South America, or have witnessed the struggles of her population with the forces of her oppressors; neyertheless no inhabitant of Europe is the less convinced that such a country exists, and that her children are free. No one presumes to deny the existence of London, or Naples, or Calcutta, al. though' he may not have visited either of these cities. Of all these and similar truths, he is convinced, 'by the testimony of the historian, the journalist, or the traveller.

But testimony, which serves man so faithfully in matters of ordinary life, as that it is a substitute

for sight and experience, is not less necessary to · him in matters of religion. The facts which the

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Christian faith embraces, having occurred nearly eighteen hundred years ago, must, if we would give a reason for the hope that is in us, be esta blished by testimony. it has, indeed, been objected, that the leading facts of the Christian faith, being miraculous, cannot be proved by testimony; for that nothing but the evidence of the senses should be received as proof of a miracle, inasmuch as testimony is often found to be false, but that we never perceive the order of nature to be disturbed. Reserving a fuller reply for a future lecture may remark, that the objection is not warranted

O 0111s 1116611 TWT either by nature or practice. We naturally confide in, and act upon, testimony, in all cases wherein there is no reason to suspect, either from the character or conduct of the party giving it that it proceeds from corrupt motives. We know, both from our own sensations and from experience, that there is a strong tendency in the human mind to veracity in testimony;* and that we are at all times strongly inclined to put faith in it: so much so, indeed, that we are daily and hourly confiding in this species of evidence ;- not only with regard to the common occurrences of life, but with respect, also, to the most extraordinary and unexpeeted events ;—not only in trivial matters, but in such as are of the greatest moment to our own welfare and happiness. In fact, testimony influences all human concerns, and combines, with observation and experience, to direct all mens Stut12002 R TRITE 9111 vieobio, lo 2191160 of ribe2gon See Ds: Price's Pisserlations, bus tdgie, to

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aetions. Me should act unreasonably, therefore, if we were to refuse our assent to facts, howsoever they might differ from such as had come under our own notice and experience, merely on account of their resting on the foundation of testimony. If, ir from the character and conduct of the men, there èould be no reasonable ground for suspecto ingyi gither, that they were deceived themselves, or, that they intended to deceive others; and, more particularly, if the result of their testimony were, to thel witnesses,o not honour and emolument, but, on the contrary, disgrace, and loss, and suffering, wé osliould have good reason for believing their evidence lang

po ito'plze pt.jsp - But quitting these general observations respecting the use and importance of testimony, I would proceed to remark upon it, as a main branch of evidence in support of our holy religion, and endeavour to show, that the testimony of the Christian witnesses is worthy of all belief. n

One of the prevailing modes of attack upon Christianity seems to be, the denying of the genuireness of the books in which it is handed down to us. Nevertheless this must be noticed as a comparatively new feature in unbelief. As well might we deny the genuineness of the writings of Cæsar, or Virgil, or of any other ancient author, as of those of the Evangelists and Apostles. What was received as genuine nearly eighteen centuries ago-what was not disputed by Celsus and Porphyry and other early unbelievers, cannot reasonably be deemed a forgery in the present

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