Principles of General Grammar: Adapted to the Capacity of Youth, and Proper to Serve as an Introduction to the Study of Languages

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Page 114 - Wednesday. Doth he feel it? No. Doth he hear it? No. Is it insensible then? Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living ? No. Why? Detraction will not suffer it :— therefore I'll none of it : Honour is a mere scutcheon, and so ends my catechism.
Page 96 - For them no more the blazing hearth shall burn Or busy housewife ply her evening care: No children run to lisp their sire's return, Or climb his knees the envied kiss to share.
Page 116 - Silence was pleased: now glowed the firmament With living sapphires; Hesperus that led The starry host rode brightest, till the moon, Rising in clouded majesty, at length Apparent queen unveiled her peerless light, And o'er the dark her silver mantle threw.
Page 96 - On the other side, Satan, alarmed, Collecting all his might, dilated stood, Like Teneriff or Atlas, unremoved : His stature reached the sky, and on his crest Sat Horror plumed ; nor wanted in his grasp What seemed both spear and shield.
Page 111 - Hamlet: What, looked he frowningly? Horatio: A countenance more in sorrow than in anger. Hamlet: Pale or red? Horatio: Nay, very pale. Hamlet: And fixed his eyes upon you? Horatio: Most constantly. Hamlet: I would I had been there.
Page 73 - EXTREMUM hunc, Arethusa, mihi concede laborem. pauca meo Gallo, sed quae legat ipsa Lycoris, carmina sunt dicenda : neget quis carmina Gallo ? sic tibi, cum fluctus subterlabere Sicanos, Doris amara suam non intermisceat undam, incipe ; sollicitos Galli dicamus amores, dum tenera attondent simae virgulta capellae.
Page 29 - ... with an earnestness which shows how truly he avows that it is incompatible with his own opposite opinion. First, He fails to see clearly the facts — the actual usage — on the ground of which I contend for the relative classification of the term. Quoting from some writer on Grammar, he says — " Proper nouns designate beings in a definite manner, so that there is no need of any sign to point out the particular individuals to which they are applied. Appellative nouns " (relative or absolute)...
Page 29 - ... relative classification of the term. Quoting from some writer on Grammar, he says — " Proper nouns designate beings in a definite manner, so that there is no need of any sign to point out the particular individuals to which they are applied. Appellative nouns " (relative or absolute) " on the contrary, being common to all the individuals of the same species, when we wish to apply them to a single individual, or a certain number of individuals of this species, or lastly, to the whole species,...
Page 109 - THE COUNTRYMAN AND THE RAVEN. A RAVEN, while with glossy breast, Her new laid eggs she fondly press'd, And, on her wicker-work high mounted, Her chickens prematurely counted ; (A fault, philosophers might blame, If quite exempted from the same,) Enjoy'd at ease the genial day...
Page 100 - The first and principal use of the Passive Voice is, to express an action without pointing out the subject who acts, which we are frequently obliged to do, sometimes because we do not know the Subject who acts, and sometimes because we do not wish to let those whom we address know it.

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