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lable that was appropriated for him. The con

tributions of correspondents were not distinuished at all. Of these, a few have eluded iscovery; but the names of such as are known

are affixed to their respective numbers.

No.

14. On Indolence . . . . Mackenzie.

15. Of Education—A classical contrasted with a

fashionable Education . . . . . . Home.

16. Of Spring—Effects of that Season on some

Minds - - - - - - - - Mackenzie.

17. Description of a Shopkeeper Virtuoso in a Let-

ter from his Wife Rebecca Prune: Tytler–Obser-

vations suggested by it . . . Mackenzie.

18. Of national Character—Comparison of that of

France and England . . . . . . Abercromby.

19. Some farther Particulars in the Character of

Mr. Umphraville - - - Craig.

20. On the Acrimony of literary Disputes; Narra-

tive of a Meeting between Sylvester and Alcan-

der - - - - - - - - - - Craig.

21. Description of a nervous Wife, in a Letter from

Joseph Meekly: Lord Hailes.—Of the Connexion

formed by Misanthropy, in a Letter from Adelus.

Mackenzie.

22. On the Restraints and Disguise of modern Edu-

cation.—Character of Cleone, in a Letter from

Laelius . . . . . . . Unknown.

23. History of a good-hearted Man, no one's Enemy

but his own - - - - Mackenzie.

24. Advantage which the Artist in the fine Arts

has over Nature in the assemblage and arrange-

ment of Objects; exemplified in Milton's Allegro

and Penseroso . . . . Richardson.

25. Description of the Visit of a great Lady to the

House of a Man of small Fortune, in a second

Letter from Mr. Homespun . . Mackenzie.

26. The Rules of external Behaviour a Criterion of

Manners—Modern Good-breeding compared with

the ancient - - - - - - - Craig.

27. The silent Expression of Sorrow—Feelings and
Behaviour of Mr. Wentworth . . . Cullen.

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