The Confederate Cause and Conduct in the War Between the States: As Set Forth in the Reports of the History Committee of the Grand Camp, C.V., of Virginia, and Other Confederate Papers

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I just started reading this book it is great and for me a person that loves history like I do. It is sad that a way of life disapeared from the face of the earth. All that had to be done was write them out of history by writing a few words that were not true or left a little out. It is good that all this was writen back then so that other generations could find and read about the truth behind the Civil War.  

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Page 168 - I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality...
Page 200 - It is with heartfelt satisfaction, that the Commanding General announces to the army, that the operations of the last three days have determined that our enemy must either ingloriously fly, or come out from behind his defences, and give us battle on our own ground, where certain destruction awaits him.
Page 31 - I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion, that, if this bill passes, the bonds of this union are, -virtually, dissolved ; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare, definitely, for a separation : amicably, if they can ; violently, if they must.* (Mr.
Page 32 - ... if the cotton states shall decide that they can do better out of the Union than in it, we insist on letting them go in peace.
Page 8 - Virginia, declare and make known that the powers granted under the Constitution, being derived from the people of the United States, may be resumed by them whenever the same shall be perverted to their injury or oppression...
Page 76 - Should you capture Charleston, I hope that by some accident the place may be destroyed; and if a little salt should be sown upon its site, it may prevent the growth of future crops of nullification and secession...
Page 40 - governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed,' and as established by the war of the Revolution for the people of the States respectively.
Page 81 - The Commanding General therefore earnestly exhorts the troops to abstain with most scrupulous care from unnecessary or wanton injury to private property ; and he enjoins upon all officers to arrest and bring to summary punishment all who shall in any way offend against the orders on this subject. RE LEE, General.
Page 168 - Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery — subordination to the superior race — is his natural and normal condition.
Page 61 - All wanton violence committed against persons in the invaded country, all destruction of property not commanded by the authorized officer, all robbery, all pillage or sacking, even after taking a place by main force, all rape, wounding, maiming, or killing of such inhabitants, are prohibited under the penalty of death, or such other severe punishment as may seem adequate for the gravity of the offense.

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