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pity me; you are not now at leisure to hear my • whole story; but this I assure you, I was betrayed

by the most solemn promises of marriage; nay, ' in the eye of heaven I was married to him; for “after much reading on the subject, I am con

vinced that particular ceremonies are only requisite to give a legal sanction to marriage, and have ' only a worldly use in giving a woman the pri'vileges of a wife; but that she who lives constant 'to one man, after a solemn private affiance, what' ' ever the world may call her, hath little to charge * on her own conscience.' 'I am sorry, Madam, said Allworthy, you made so ill an use of your ' learning. Indeed, it would have been well that

you had been possessed of much more, or had * remained in a state of ignorance. And yet, Ma• dam, I am afraid you have more than tắis sin to answer for.' · During his life,? answered she, which was above a dozen years, I most solemnly ' assure you, I had not.

I had not. And consider, Sir, on my 'behalf what is in the power of a woman stript of • her reputation, and left destitute; whether the

good-natured world will suffer such a stray sheep to return to the road of virtue, even if she was • never so desirous. I protest then, I would have * chose it had it been in my power; but necessity * drove me into the arms of captain Waters, with

whom, though still unmarried, I lived as a wife ' for many years, and went by his name. I parted ' with this gentleman at Worcester, on his march

against the rebels, and it was then I accidentally 'met with Mr. Jones, who rescued me from the • hands of a villain. Indeed, he is the worthiest 6 of men. No young gentleman of his age is, I • believe, freer from vice, and few have the twen' tieth part of his virtues; nay, whatever vices he . hath had, I am firmly persuaded he hath now • taken a resolution to abandon them.' 'I hope • he hath,' cries Allworthy, and I hope he will

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' preserve that resolution. I must say, I have still • the same hopes with regard to yourself

. The world, I do agree, are apt to be too unmerciful • on these occasions; yet time and perseverance ' will get the better of this their disinclination, as 'I may call it, to pity; for though they are not, like heaven, ready to receive a penitent sinner; yet a continued repentance will at length obtain mercy even with the world. This you may be assured of, Mrs. Waters, that whenever I find

you are sincere in such good intentions, you shall want no assistance in my power to make them • effectual.'

Mrs. Waters fell now upon her knees before him, and, in a flood of tears, made him many most passionate acknowledgements of his goodness, which, as she truly said, savoured more of the divine than human nature.

Allworthy raised her up, and spoke in the most tender manner, making use of every expression which his invention could suggest to comfort her, when 'he was interrupted by the arrival of Mr. Dowling, who, upon his first entrance, seeing Mrs. Waters, started, and appeared in some confusion; from which he soon recovered himself as well as he could, and then said, he was in the utmost haste to attend counsel at Mr. Western's lodgings; but, however, thought it his duty to call and acquaint him with the opinion of counsel, upon the case which he had before told him, which was, that the conversion of the monies in that case could not be questioned in a criminal cause, but that an action of trover might be brought, and if it appeared to the jury to be the monies of plaintiff, that plaintiff would recover a verdict for the value.

Allworthy, without making any answer to this, bolted the door, and then advancing with a stern look to Dowling, he said, “Whatever be your 'haste, Sir, I must first receive an answer to some

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* questions. Do you know this lady?'--'That

. • lady, Sir!' answered Dowling, with great hesitation. Allworthy then, with the most solemn voice, said, 'Look you, Mr. Dowling, as you value

my favour, or your continuance a moment longer ‘in my service, do not hesitate nor prevaricate; 'but answer faithfully and truly to every question 'I ask. —-Do you know this lady?'“Sir,' said Dowling, 'I have seen the lady. * Where, Sir?' ' At her own lodgings,'

Upon what business did you go thither, Sir; and who sent you?' 'I went, Sir, to inquire, Sir, about 'Mr. Jones.' 'And who sent you to inquire about

him?' Who, Sir? why, Sir, Mr. Blitil sent me." ' And what did you say to the lady concerning.

that matter?' Nay, Sir, it is impossible to re‘ collect every word.' Will you please, Madam, to assist the gentleman's memory? “ He told

me, Sir,” said Mrs. Waters, “ that if Mr. Jones “ had murdered my husband, I should be assisted " by any money I wanted to carry on the prose

cution, by a very worthy gentleman, who was “well apprized what a villain I had to deal with. “ These, I can safely swear, were the

very

words -Were these the words, Sir?' said Allworthy. “I cannot charge my memory ex*actly,' cries Dowling, but I believe I did speak * to that purpose.

And did Mr. Blifil order you 'to say so?' 'I am sure, Sir, I should not have

gone on my own accord, nor have willingly ex'ceeded my authority in matters of this kind. If 'I said so, I must have so understood Mr. Blifil's 'instructions.' 'Look you, Mr. Dowling,' said Allworthy; ' I promise you before this lady, that . whatever you have done in this affair by Mr. • Blifil's order, I will forgive, provided you now ' tell me strictly the truth; for I believe what you

say, that you would not have acted of your own 'accord, and without authority in this matter.

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Mr. Blifil then likewise sent you to examine the two fellows at Aldersgate?' --He did, Sir.' *Well, and what instructions did he then give you?' • Recollect as well as you can, and tell me, as near * as possible, the very words he used'--'Why, "Sir, Mr. Blitil sent me to find out the persons who

were eye-witnesses of this fight. He said, he - feared they might be tampered with by Mr. Jones,

or some of his friends. He said, blood required

blood; and that not only all who concealed a mur• derer, but those who omitted any thing in their power to bring him to justice, were sharers in his guilt. He said, he found you was very desirous of having the villain brought to justice, though it was not proper you should appear in it.?

in it.'-lle * did so,' says Allworthy.-- Yes, Sir,' cries Dowling; “I should not, I am sure, have proceeded ' such lengths for the sake of any other person

living but your worship.'—'What lengths, Sir?' said Allworthy.- Nay, Sir,' cries Dowling, 'I * would not have your worship think I would, on

any account, be guilty of subornation of per*jury; but there are two ways of delivering evi. . ,

dence. I told them, therefore, that if any offers • should be made them on the other side, they

should refuse them, and that they might be as'sured they should lose nothing by being honest * men, and telling the truth. I said, we were toki, • that Mr. Jones had assaulted the gentleman first, .and that if that was the truth, they should de• clare it; and I did give them some hints, that they should be no losers.'— I think you went • lengths indeed,' cries Allworthy.-----Nay, Sir, ' answered Dowling, 'I am sure I did not desire • them to tell an untruth; -nor should I have • said what I did, unless it had been to oblige you.'

- You would not have thought, I believe,' says Allworthy, to have obliged me, had you known

“ • that this Mr. Jones was my own nephew.?

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'I am sure, Sir,' answered he, it did not become 'me to take any notice of what I thought you des sired to conceal.?---llow!' cries Allworthy, * and did you know it then?'— 'Nay, Sir,' answered Dowling, ‘if your worship bids me speak the 'truth, I am sure I shall do it. - Indeed, Sir, I did 'know it; for they were almost the last words • which Madam Blifil ever spoke, which she men'tioned to me as I stood alone by her bedside, • when she delivered me the letter, I brought your

' ' worship from her.'—- What letter?' cries Allworthy.-'The letter, Sir,' answered Dowling, 'which 'I brought from Salisbury, and which I delivered

into the hands of Mr. Blifil.'-'O heavens!' cries Allworthy; ‘Well, and what were the words? 'What did my sister say to you:—'She took me

by the hand,' answered he, and as she delivered me the letter, said, “I scarce know what I have “written. Teil my brother, Mír. Joncs is his ne

phew—He is my son.—Bless him,” says she, and • then fell backward, as if dying away. I presently

called in the people, and she never spoke more to

me, and died within a few minutes afterwards.'Allworthy stood a minute silent, lifting up his eyes; and then turning to Dowling, said,

-llow came you, Sir, not to deliver me this message?' 'Your worship,' answered he, ‘must remember that you was at that time ill in bed; and being in a violent hurry, as indeed I always am, I delivered the letter and message to Mr. Blisil, who told me he ' would carry them both to you, which he hath

since told me he did, and that your worship, ' partly out of friendship to Mr. Jones, and partly out of regard to your sister, would never have it

mentioned ; and did intend to conceal it from the 'world; and therefore, Sir, if you had not mentioned it to me first, I am certain I should never

have thought it belonged to me to say any thing • of the matter, either to your worship or any

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• other person.

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VOL. VII,

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