Journal of Horticulture, Cottage Gardener and Country Gentlemen, Volume 24

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G.W. Johnson, 1878 - Agriculture
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Page 212 - HANDBOOK of HARDY TREES, SHRUBS, and HERBACEOUS PLANTS, containing Descriptions, Native Countries, &c. of a Selection of the Best Species in Cultivation ; together with Cultural Details, Comparative Hardiness, Suitability for Particular Positions, &c. By WB HEMSLEY. Based on DECAISNE and NAUDIN'S Manuel de I' Amateur des Jardins, and including the 264 Original Woodcuts.
Page 53 - ... eighty years ago. No one has seen the living plant since or knows where to find it, if haply it still flourishes in some secluded spot. At length it is found in Japan; and I had the satisfaction of making the identification.* One other relative is also known in Japan; and another, still unpublished, has just been detected in Thibet.
Page 53 - Podophyllum, our mandrake, a common inhabitant of the Atlantic United States, but found nowhere else. There is one other species of it, -and that is in the Himalayas. Here are four most peculiar genera of one family, each of a single species in the Atlantic United States, which are duplicated on the other side of the world, either in identical or almost identical species, or in an analogous species, while nothing else of the kind is known in any other part of the world. I ought not to omit ginseng,...
Page 142 - I have dwelt the longer on the oak, as it is confessedly both the most picturesque tree in itself, and the most accommodating in composition. It refuses no subject either in natural or in artificial landscape. It is suited to the grandest, and may with propriety be introduced into the most pastoral. It adds new dignity to the ruined tower and...
Page 144 - ... undoubted lord of the forest. Beauty, united with strength, characterises all its parts. The leaves, elegant in their outline, are strongly ribbed, and firmly attached to the spray, which, although thin and excursive, is yet bold and determined in its angles ; whilst the abrupt and tortuous irregularity of its massive branches admirably contrasts with the general richness and density of its clustered foliage. Even as a sapling, in its slender gracefulness it exhibits sufficient firmness and indications...
Page 60 - , We request that no one will write privately to the departmental writers of the "Journal of Horticulture, Cottage Gardener, and Country Gentleman.
Page 53 - Mandchuria, and which is now known to inhabit Corea and Northern Japan. The Jesuit Fathers identified the plant in Canada and the Atlantic States, brought over the Chinese name by which we know it, and established the trade in it, which was for many years most profitable. The exportation of ginseng to China probably has not yet entirely ceased. Whether the Asiatic and the Atlantic American ginsengs are exactly of the same species or not is somewhat uncertain, but they are hardly, if at all, distinguishable.
Page 144 - The lower parts, about the roots, are often possessed by that green velvet moss, which, in a still greater degree, commonly occupies the bole of the beech, though the beauty and brilliancy of it lose much when in decay. As the trunk rises, you see the brimstone colour taking possession in patches. Of this there are two principal kinds ; a smooth sort, which spreads like a scurf over the bark ; and a rough sort, which hangs in little rich knots and fringes.
Page 33 - ... in the proportion of two parts of the former to one of the latter, and expressible by the symbol H2O.
Page 60 - Fleet Street, London, EG We also request that correspondents will not mix up on the same sheet questions relating to Gardening and those on Poultry and Bee subjects, if they expect to get them answered promptly and conveniently, but write thorn on separate communications.

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