Political Legitimacy in Southeast Asia: The Quest for Moral Authority

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Stanford University Press, 1995 - Political Science - 446 pages
The countries of Southeast Asia, most of which won their independence after World War II, have had varying degrees of success in establishing governments and political systems that in the eyes of their citizens have achieved political legitimacy - that is, are seen to have the right to rule. Because these countries have much in common and at the same time differ in important ways - with their political arrangements varying from Leninist state to monarchy, personal dictatorship to quasi-democracy - they offer what might be considered a naturally occurring political science experiment. The right to rule affects all political activities and is crucial to an understanding of the politics of any country. This book studies political legitimacy in seven Southeast Asian countries-Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Among the questions is addresses are: What is the meaning and nature of legitimacy? What are its constituent elements? Who is seeking to legitimate what? Who or which groups are crucial for legitimation? On what basis is authority claimed, acknowledged, resisted? Why do legitimation projects succeed or fail? Why is legitimacy contested? Can any overall patterns be observed?
 

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Contents

Introduction I
1
Part I
7
The Anatomy of Legitimacy
13
The Bases of Legitimacy
31
Contestation and Crisis
54
Aspects and Audiences
69
Political Legitimacy Through
108
The Languages
136
The Evolution of Legitimacy
193
Historicizing the New Orders
224
The Changing Models
257
Seeking a More Durable Basis
293
Notes
337
Bibliography
397
3
433
Copyright

The Depoliticization of
170

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About the author (1995)

Muthiah Alagappa is Distinguished Senior Fellow at the East-West Center. He is the editor of Asian Security Order: Instrumental and Normative Features (Stanford, 2003), Coercion and Governance: The Declining Political Role of the Military in Asia (Stanford, 2001), Asian Security Practice: Material and Ideational Influences (Stanford, 1998), and Political Legitimacy in Southeast Asia: The Quest for Moral Authority (Stanford, 1995).

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