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" By this we taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the scorching sun which brings them forth ; we shine in silks which our hands have never wrought ; we drink of vineyards which we never planted. "
The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal - Page 392
1926
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Notes and Queries, Volume 7

Electronic journals - 1853
...force of his original. Take, for instance, the following sentences, which admit of fair comparison : " We taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the...silks which our hands have never wrought ; we drink of vineyards which we never planted ; the treasures of those mines are ours which we have never digged...
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A Catalogue of Books, the Property of a Political Economist: With Critical ...

John Ramsay McCulloch - Catalogs, Dictionary - 1862 - 394 pages
...use them. For, why are we surrounded with the sea ? Surely that our wants at home might be supplied by our navigation into other countries, the least...silks which our hands have never wrought ; we drink of vineyards which we never planted ; the treasures of those mines are ours in which we have never digg'd...
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The New Century, Issues 1-10

Free trade - 1875 - 216 pages
...he answered, "Surely, that our wants at home might be supplied by navigation into .other countries. By this we taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the scorching sun that bringe them forth; we shine in silks that our hands have never wrought; we drink of vineyards...
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Rand, McNally & Co.'s Handy Guide to Washington and the District of Columbia

Ernest Ingersoll - Washington (D.C.) - 1893 - 184 pages
...justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God.— Micak vi, 8. Above the figure of Commerce, We taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the scorching sun which brings them forth.— Anonymous. Above the figure of History, One God, one law, one element, And one far-off divine event,...
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The Unitarian, Volume 12

Jabez Thomas Sunderland, Brooke Herford, Frederick B. Mott - Liberalism (Religion) - 1897
...Above the gigantic female figure representing commerce are placed the words, from some unknown author, "We taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the scorching sun which brings them forth." In these words, what have we? A touch of humanity. A confession of human brotherhood. A recognition...
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Library of Congress and the Interior Decorations: A Practical Guide for Visitors

Charles Bingham Reynolds - 1897 - 23 pages
...humbly with thy God?— Micah vi: 8. Commerce (by Flanagan), holding miniature locomotive and ship: We taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the scorching sun which brings them forth. — Considerations on East India Trade. History (by French), with a book and a reflecting mirror: One...
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Rand, McNally & Co.'s Pictorial Guide to Washington and Environs ...

Washington (D.C.) - 1900 - 206 pages
...jnstly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God.— Micah vi: 8. Above the figure of Commerce, We taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the scorching sun which brings them forth. --Anonymoas. Above the figure of Histvry, One God, one law, one element, AuU one far-off divine event,...
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A Complete Collection of the Quotations and Inscriptions in the Library of ...

Quotations - 1902 - 23 pages
...thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thv God? MICAH. vi., 8. Commerce We taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the scorching sun which brings them forth. SIR DUDLKY NORTH. East India Trade. One God, one law, one element, And one far-ofl", divine event,...
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Kolonialpolitik

Alfred Zimmermann - Colonies - 1905 - 424 pages
...use them. For why are we surrounded with the sea? Surely, that^our wants at hörne might he supplyed by our navigation into other countries, the least...silks which our hands have never wrought; we drink of vineyards which we never planted; the treasures of those mines are ours in which we have never digged;...
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Branch Library News, Volumes 1-3

New York Public Library - Classified catalogs - 1914
...fancy. They may cause us to see and understand things of which we should otherwise have been ignorant. "We taste the spices of Arabia yet never feel the scorching sun which brings them forth," — that inscription is on the walls of the Library of Congress, and it describes alike the services...
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