The Quarterly Review, Volume 119

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John Murray, 1866 - English literature

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Page 521 - Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven; but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven.
Page 146 - tis a common proof That lowliness is young ambition's ladder, Whereto the climber.upward turns his face; But when he once attains the upmost round, He then unto the ladder turns his back, Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees By which he did ascend.
Page 222 - All murder'd: for within the hollow crown That rounds the mortal temples of a king Keeps Death his court; and there the antic sits, Scoffing his state and grinning at his pomp...
Page 519 - And they said, Some say that thou art John the Baptist : some, Elias ; and others, Jeremias, or one of the prophets.
Page 398 - ... have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists: there is a similar reason, though not quite so forcible, for supposing that both the Gothick and the Celtick, though blended with a very different idiom, had the same origin with the Sanscrit; and the old Persian might be added to the same family, if this were the place for discussing any question concerning...
Page 522 - If there be among you a poor man of one of thy brethren within any of thy gates in thy land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, thou shalt not harden thine heart, nor shut thine hand from thy poor brother : but thou shalt open thine hand wide unto him. and shalt surely lend him sufficient for his need, in that which he wanteth.
Page 398 - The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 317 - West has conquered — he has treated his subject as it ought to be treated — I retract my objections. I foresee that this picture will not only become one of the most popular, but will occasion a revolution in art.
Page 525 - But ye denied the Holy One and the Just, and desired a murderer to be granted unto you ; And killed the Prince of life, whom God hath raised from the dead ; whereof we are witnesses.
Page 524 - eating the flesh," and " drinking the blood of the Son of man.

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