The Works of Henry Fielding: Tom Jones. 1893

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J. M. Dent & Company, 1893
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Page 64 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse, steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands : But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed, Oth.
Page 52 - Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night...
Page 14 - The foibles and vices of men, in whom there is great mixture of good, become more glaring objects from the virtues which contrast them and shew their deformity; and when we find such vices attended with their evil consequence to our favourite characters, we are not only taught to shun them for our own sake, but to hate them for the mischiefs they have already brought on those we love.
Page 81 - I made no doubt but that his designs were strictly honourable, as the phrase is; that is, to rob a lady of her fortune by way of marriage.
Page 202 - Come, thou that hast inspired thy Aristophanes, thy Lucian, thy Cervantes, thy Rabelais, thy Moliere, thy Shakespear, thy Swift, thy Marivaux, fill my pages with humour ; till mankind learn the good-nature to laugh only at the follies of others, and the humility to grieve at their own.
Page 63 - Vice hath not, I believe, a more abject slave ; society produces not a more odious vermin ; nor can the devil receive a guest more worthy of him, nor possibly more welcome to him, than a slanderer.
Page ix - ... to captivate the heart of Mr. Jones." "First, from two lovely blue eyes, whose bright orbs flashed lightning at their discharge, flew forth two pointed ogles ; but, happily for our...
Page 68 - ... that the other still continued to attend her, as she pursued no great road, and had already passed through several turnings ) , accosted the strange lady in a most obliging tone ; and said, " She was very happy to find they were both travelling the same way." The other, who, like a ghost, only wanted to be spoke to, readily answered...
Page 64 - Who steals my purse steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; ' 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands : But he that filches from me my good name, Robs me of that which not enriches him, But makes me poor indeed.
Page 5 - ... the discovery. The beauty of Jones highly charmed her eye ; but as she could not see his heart, she gave herself no concern about it. She could feast heartily at the table of love, without reflecting that some other already had been, or hereafter might be, feasted with the same repast. A sentiment which, if it deals but little in refinement, deals, however, much in substance ; and is less capricious, and perhaps less ill-natured and selfish, than the desires of those females who can be contented...

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