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THE

NONCONFORMIST'S

MEMORIAL;

BEING

AN ACCOUNT OF THE LIVES, SUFFERINGS,

AND
PRINTED WORKS

OF THE
TWO THOUSAND MINISTERS
Ejected from the Church of England, chiefly by the Act of Uniformity,

Aug. 24, 1662.

ORIGINALLY WRITTEN BY

EDMUND CALAMY, D. D.

Abridged, Corrected, and Methodized, with many additional Anecdotes

AND
SEVERAL NEW LIVES,
BY SAMUEL PALMER.

The Second Edition.

į IN THREE VOLUMES.
Embellished with Heads of the principal Divines, chiefly from original Pictures.

VOL. III..

Your brethren that hated you, and cast you out, for my name-sake, said, Let the Lord be
glorified. But he shall appear to your joy, and they shall be ashamed.

ISAIAH, Ixvi. 5.
When the governors of the church impose, as conditions of my communion, things that are

either unlawful in themselves, or that, after due examination, I verily believe are unlawful,
I am bound, in obedience to the authority of Christ, rather to desert that communion than
comply with the terms and conditions of it.

SCOTI's Christian Life,

LONDON:

PRINTED BY J. CUNDEE, IVY-LANE,
FOR BUTTON AND SON, AND T. HURST, PATERNOSTER-ROW ;

Sold also by
CONDER, BUCKLERSBURY; AND JAMES, BRISTOL.

1803. :

LOAN STACK

BX5206
C3

PREFACE

1802

v. 3

TO THE THIRD VOLUME.

ON a review of this work it is sufficiently evident, that the number of ministers ejected or silenced soon after the Restoration, instead of being much smaller than Dr. Calamy had stated (as their enemies would have it believed,) is on the contrary considerably larger; and it has likewise appeared, that we are yet far from possessing the names of all those who either resigned, or refused to accept, livings in the church of England, on account of the new terms of conformity imposed in the year 1662.

It deserves also to be mentioned, as honourable to the cause of Nonconformity, that among those who afterwards conformed, there were great numbers in most parts of the kingdom who at first hesitated, and even relinquished their benefices, and not a few who for some years espoused the cause of the Nonconformists. Several of these were great and good men, who to the last retained the spirit of their Dissenting brethren, always treated them with the greatest candour and respect, and would gladly have promoted such alterations in the terms of conformity as would have fully satisfied them. But others plainly shewed, by their subsequent behaviour, that they were influenced in their conformity chiefly by motives of worldly interest. Even their conduct, however, gives weight to the arguments in favour of Nonconformity; and had not honour and emolument lain on the other side, our list would have been much larger.

VOL. III.

A 2

It

652

It is easy to conceive that some upright and pious men might be imperceptibly influenced, in yielding to what their impartial judgments would not have intirely approved, by a regard to secular advantage and the dread of suffering, as well as by the hope of some favourable alterations in the establishment; and it is well-known that in some cases great influence was exerted, by persons of power and wealth, to keep clergymen of character and ability in the church who would otherwise have lest it, on account of the unreasonable impositions of the Uniformity-act. As a proof of this, it may be proper here to insert the following paper which the editor received from a correspondent in WestMORELAND, in the year 1775, respecting what was known to be matter of fact in that county; and it is easy to believe that similar circumstances took place in some others.

The following remarks are taken from an original MS. in the hands of a gentleman in the county of Westmoreland, which bears date 1669. In mentioning that unhappy year 1662, he says as follows: ..

“ We have in Westmoreland perhaps fewer clergy who have been deprived of their livings than most other counties in England: not because they favoured Episcopacy; for they did not; but on different motives they have mostly conformed. The gentry have exerted themselves to the utmost, in their respective neighbourhoods, to prevent Nonconformity. The most active in this matter are as follows. In the East Ward, the Countess of Dorset, Pembroke and Montgomery, who constantly resides here, being three months at each of her castles : viz. the spring at Brough; the summer at Pendragon; the autumn at Brougham; and the winter at Appleby. She diffuses her charity where it is wanted, and has great influence amongst the Clergy.--Also the Musgraves of Hartley Castle ; the Dents of Hilbeck Hall; the Dalstons of Smardall Hill; the Sandfords of Ormside and Hougill castles; have all endeavoured to prevent Nonconformity.-In the West Ward, the following nobility and gentry are exerting themselves in favour of Eniscopacy: viz. Lord Clifford

nt Ashby; the 'Nevisons at Newby; the Thwaites at Naddle; the Tathams at Asham; and the Flemmings at Crosby.--In Kendal Ward, the Flemmings at Rydall; the Phil-' lipsons of Ambleside; the Stricklands of Syzergh (who are papists); the Belinghams of Levons; the Willsons of Dalham Tower, &c.-In Lonsdale Ward, the Wilsons of Casterton; the Mydeltons, Middleton Hall; the Otways and the Brathwaites, are all exerting themselves. After such united force, we cannot expect the Dissenters to be much encouraged. Conformity is not by choice, but by constraint.--Mr. Francis Higginson, of Kirkby Steven; Mr. John Dalton of Shap; Mr. Thomas Dodgson of Ravenstonedale, are all conformed; and the generality of my acquaintance think_much against their inclination.” .

Since this second edition of the Nonconformist's Memorial commenced, two other periodical works have appeared in opposition to it. The one intitled The Orthodox Church-man's Magazine: a performance too contemptible to deserve any further notice than was taken of it on the covers of some of our num“ bers, where the grossest ignorance of the editors, in the plainest matters of fact, was clearly evinced. The other is entitled The Church-man's Memorial, which is chiefly an abridgment of Walker's Sufferings of the Clergy; for an account of which work, and the answers to it (long since published, and never confuted) the reader is referred to the Note in the Preface to the first vol. of The Noncon. Mem. p. 13.

The editor has now to make his acknowledgments to those of his brethren, and other correspondents who have contributed to the improvements in this new edition. Besides those whose names were mentioned with the articles which they communicated, particular thanks are due to the Rev. Mr. Sutcliff of Olney, Dr. Ryland of Bristol, Dr. Toulmin of Taunton, Robert Wild Moult, Esq. of Wickersley, Yorkshire; Mr. Smith of Sheffield, and Mr. Whittuck of Bristol, for corrections, or anecdotes, or the use of Lives or Funeral Sermons. If any of these or other correspondents should be disappointed in not seeing some articles inserted which they had sent to the editor, they

are

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