The History of Tom Jones: a foundling, volume 2

Front Cover
William Allan Neilson
P. F. Collier & Son, 1917 - Fiction - 538 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 333 - Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council; and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.
Page 13 - Hence we are to derive that universal contempt which the world, who always denominate the whole from the majority, have cast on all historical writers who do not draw their materials from records. And it is the apprehension of this contempt that hath made us so cautiously avoid the term romance, a name with which we might otherwise have been well enough contented.
Page 84 - Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night...
Page 400 - O la! what noise is that? There he is again.-- Well to be certain, though I know there is nothing at all in it, I am glad I am not down yonder, where those men are.
Page 399 - I know there is nothing in them: not that it was the ghost that surprized me, neither; for I should have known that to have been only a man in a strange dress; but when I saw the little man so frightened himself, it was that which took hold of me.
Page 51 - The foibles and vices of men, in whom there is great mixture of good, become more glaring objects from the virtues which contrast them and shew their deformity ; and when we find such vices attended with their evil consequence to our favourite characters, we are not only taught to shun, them for our own sake, but to hate them for the mischiefs they have already brought on those we love.
Page 220 - ... charming ages yet to come. Foretel me that some tender maid, whose grandmother is yet unborn, hereafter, when, under the fictitious name of Sophia, she reads the real worth which once existed in my Charlotte, shall from her sympathetic breast send forth the heaving sigh. Do thou teach me not only to foresee, but to enjoy, nay, even to feed on future praise. Comfort me by...
Page 401 - No wonder then," cries Partridge, "that the place is haunted. But I never saw in my life a worse gravedigger. I had a sexton, when I was clerk, that should have dug three graves while he is digging one. The fellow handles a spade as if it was the first time he had ever had one in his hand.
Page 400 - Partridge sat in fearful expectation of this; and now, when the ghost made his next appearance, Partridge cried out, " There, sir, now! what say you now? Is he frightened now, or no? As much frightened as you think me, — and to be sure, nobody can help some fears. I would not be in so bad a condition as what 's his name, — Squire Hamlet, — is there, for all the world.
Page 402 - Partridge, with a contemptuous sneer ; ' why, I could act as well as he myself. I am sure if I had seen a ghost, I should have looked in the very same manner, and done just as he did. And then, to be sure, in that scene, as you called it, between him and his mother, where you told me he acted so fine, why, Lord help me, any man, that is any good man, that had such a mother, would have done exactly the same. I know you are only joking with me ; but, indeed, madam, though I was never at a play in London,...

Bibliographic information