Code of Federal Regulations

Front Cover
U.S. General Services Administration, National Archives and Records Service, Office of the Federal Register, 1971 - Administrative law
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 339 - entire devotion to the interest of the client, warm zeal in the maintenance and defense of his rights and the exertion of his utmost learning and ability," to the end that nothing be taken or be withheld from him, save by the rules of law, legally applied. No fear of judicial disfavor or public unpopularity should restrain him from the full discharge of his duty.
Page 205 - All officers and employees of the United States or of the District of Columbia who are members of the Naval Reserve (also Marine Corps Reserve) shall be entitled to leave of absence from their respective duties without loss of pay, time, or efficiency rating, on all days during which they...
Page 339 - A lawyer should not in any way communicate upon the subject of controversy with a party represented by counsel; much less should he undertake to negotiate or compromise the matter with him, but should deal only with his counsel. It is incumbent upon the lawyer most particularly to avoid everything that may tend to mislead a party not represented by counsel, and he should not undertake to advise him as to the law.
Page 398 - For the purposes of paragraph I (a) hereof every person employed in the active military or naval service shall be taken to have been in sound condition when examined, accepted, and enrolled for service...
Page 339 - No fear of judicial disfavor or public unpopularity should restrain him from the full discharge of his duty. 1n the judicial forum the client is entitled to the benefit of any and every remedy and defense that is authorized by the law of the land, and he may expect his lawyer to assert every such remedy or defense.
Page 339 - PUNCTUALITY AND EXPEDITION It is the duty of the lawyer not only to his client, but also to the courts and to the public to be punctual in attendance, and to be concise and direct in the trial and disposition of causes.
Page 339 - ... the disclosure or use of these confidences, either for the private advantage of the lawyer or his employees or to the disadvantage of the lawyer or his employees or to the disadvantage of the client, without his knowledge and consent, and even though there are other available sources of such information.
Page 339 - Clients, not lawyers, are the litigants. Whatever may be the ill-feeling existing between clients, it should not be allowed to influence counsel in their conduct and demeanor toward each other or toward suitors in the case. All personalities between counsel should be scrupulously avoided. In the trial of a cause it is indecent to allude to the personal history or the personal peculiarities and idiosyncrasies of counsel on the other side. Personal colloquies between counsel which cause delay and promote...
Page 38 - I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.
Page 338 - When lawyers jointly associated in a cause cannot agree as to any matter vital to the interest of the client, the conflict of opinion should be frankly stated to him for his final determination.

Bibliographic information