CAMP-FIRE AND COTTON-FIELD: SOUTHERN ADVENTURE IN TIME OF WAR

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Page 369 - The amnesty offered for the past is conditioned upon an unreserved loyalty for the future, and this condition will be enforced with an iron hand. Whoever is indifferent or hostile must choose between the liberty which foreign lands afford the poverty of the rebel states, and the innumerable and inappreciable blessings which our government confers upon its people.
Page 366 - The encouragement of independent industry will strengthen all the advantages which capital derives from labor, and enable the laborer to take care of himself and prepare for the time when he can render so much labor for so much money, which is the great end to be attained.
Page 258 - Whom it May Concern : Whereas, it appears to my satisfaction that Thomas W. Knox, a correspondent of the New York "Herald," has been by the sentence of a court-martial excluded from the military department under command of Major-General Grant, and also that General Thayer, president of the court-martial which rendered the sentence, and Major-General McClernand, in command of a corps of that department, and many other respectable persons, are of opinion that Mr. Knox's offense was technical rather...
Page 363 - When you find it necessary to use the whip — and desirable as it would be to dispense with it entirely, it is necessary at times — apply it slowly and deliberately, and to the extent you are determined in your own mind to be needful before you begin. The indiscriminate, constant and excessive use of the whip is altogether unnecessary and inexcusable.
Page 368 - The most faithful and discreet officers will be selected for this duty, and the largest force consistent with the public service detailed for their assistance. "XXI. Employers, and especially overseers, are notified that undue influence used to move the marshal from his just balance between the parties representing labor and capital will result in immediate change of officers, and thus defeat that regular and stable system upon which the interests of all parties depend. "XXII. Successful industry...
Page 181 - SIR: I have respectfully to request that you will surrender the city of Memphis to the authority of the United States, which I have the honor to represent. I am, Mr. Mayor, with high respect, your most obedient servant, CH DAVIS, Flag-Officer, Commanding, fyc., fyc. His Honor the MAYOR of the city of Memphis, Tenn.
Page 366 - Duty 119 sickness, or stubborn refusal of duty, they will be turned over to the provostmarshal of the parish, for labor upon the public works, without pay. XIV. Laborers will be permitted to cultivate land on private account, as herein specified, as follows: First and...
Page 363 - Never be induced by a course of good behavior on the part of negroes to relax the strictness of your discipline; but, when you have by judicious management brought them to that state, keep them so by the same means. By taking frequent strolls about the premises, including of course the quarter and stock yards, during the evening and at least twice a week during the night, you will put a more effectual stop to any irregularities than by the most severe punishments. The only way to keep a negro honest...
Page 227 - ... General Orders, No. 72, from Head-quarters District of West Tennessee, and will open a camp for them at Grand Junction, where they will be suitably cared for and organized into companies and set to •work, picking, ginning, and baling all cotton now outstanding in fields.
Page 452 - ... glowing expression. The size of the cotton-plant depends upon the accident of climate and soil. The cotton of Tennessee bears very little resemblance to the luxuriant growth of Alabama and Georgia; but even in those favored states the cotton-plant is not every where the same, for in the rich bottom lands it grows to a commanding size, while in the more barren regions it is an humble shrub. In the rich alluvium of the Mississippi the cotton will tower beyond the reach of the tallest "picker...

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