The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness

Front Cover
Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch, Evan Thompson
Cambridge University Press, May 14, 2007 - Psychology
The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness is the first of its kind in the field, and its appearance marks a unique time in the history of intellectual inquiry on the topic. After decades during which consciousness was considered beyond the scope of legitimate scientific investigation, consciousness re-emerged as a popular focus of research towards the end of the last century, and it has remained so for nearly 20 years. There are now so many different lines of investigation on consciousness that the time has come when the field may finally benefit from a book that pulls them together and, by juxtaposing them, provides a comprehensive survey of this exciting field. An authoritative desk reference, which will also be suitable as an advanced textbook.
 

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Contents

Phenomenology
67
Indian Theories
89
Artificial Intelligence and Consciousness
117
goal structure
157
Global Workspace
163
location
165
response system
168
Cognitive Theories of Consciousness
177
now
416
Normal
435
Consciousness in Hypnosis
445
Can We Study Subjective Experiences
481
Meditation and the Neuroscience of
499
235
524
Social Psychological Approaches to
555
The Evolution of Consciousness
571

Episodic
185
Language
187
Visuospatial
188
VISION
189
Conscious
196
Broadcasting
198
Behavioral Neuroimaging
207
Three Forms of Consciousness
251
Metacognition and Consciousness
289
Consciousness and Control of Action
327
Language and Consciousness
355
Narrative
375
References
399
The Development of Consciousness
405
semantic LTM
411
Evolutionary
597
Australopithecus afarensis
604
Anthropology of Consciousness
631
Motivation Decision Making and
673
Mode of expression
696
Toward a
707
Authors
709
awake asleep
710
Neurodynamical Approaches
731
The Thalamic Intralaminar Nuclei
775
The Cognitive Neuroscience
809
The Affective Neuroscience of
831
S+
833
Situated and Social
863
Quantum Approaches to Consciousness
881

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Page 46 - I think that tastes, odors, colors, and so on are no more than mere names so far as the object in which we place them is concerned, and that they reside only in the consciousness. Hence if the living creatures were removed, all these qualities would be wiped away and annihilated.

About the author (2007)

Philip David Zelazo is Professor of Psychology at the University of Toronto, where he holds a Canada Research Chair in Developmental Neuroscience. He is also Co-Director of the Sino-Canadian Centre for Research in Child Development, Southwest University, China. He was Founding Editor of the Journal of Cognition and Development. His research, which is funded by both NSERC of Canada and CIHR, focuses on the mechanisms underlying typical and atypical development of executive function - the conscious self-regulation of thought, action, and emotion.

Morris Moscovitch is the Max and Gianna Glassman Chair in Neuropsychology and Aging in the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto. He is also the Senior Scientist at the Rotman Research Institute of Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. His research focuses on the neuropsychology of memory in humans while also studying attention, face-recognition, and hemispheric specialization in young and older adults, and in people with brain damage.

Evan Thompson is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Mind in Life: Biology, Phenomenology, and the Sciences of Mind and Colour Vision: A Study in Cognitive Science and the Philosophy of Perception. He is also the co-author of The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience. He is a former holder of a Canada Research Chair.