The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal, Volume 46

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R. Griffiths, 1772 - Books

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Page 12 - And it came to pass, that the beggar died and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried; and in hell he lifted up his eyes, being in torments and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.
Page 4 - A Form of Prayer with Fasting, to be used yearly on the 30th of January, being the day of the martyrdom of the blessed King Charles the First j to implore the mercy of GOD, that neither the guilt of that sacred and innocent blood, nor those other sins, by which GOD was provoked to deliver up both us and our king into the hands of cruel and unreasonable men, may at any time hereafter be visited upon us or our posterity.
Page 253 - Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints.
Page 4 - The painter has no other means of giving an idea of the dignity of the mind but by that external appearance which grandeur of thought does generally, though not always, impress on the countenance and by that correspondence of figure to sentiment and situation which all men wish, but cannot command.
Page 247 - When you leave the unimpaired, hereditary freehold to your children, you do but half 'your duty. Both liberty and property are precarious, unless the possessors have sense and spirit enough to defend them. This is not the language of vanity. If I am a vain man, my gratification lies within a narrow circle. I am the sole depositary of my own secret, and it shall perish with me.
Page 212 - Not her, the praise is due : his gradual touch Has moulder'd into beauty many a tower, Which, when it frown'd with all its battlements, Was only terrible...
Page 5 - Bolognian schools; and the other, by making the colours very distinct and forcible, such as we see in those of Rome and Florence; but still, the presiding principle of both those manners is simplicity. Certainly...
Page 9 - Thus if .a portrait-painter is desirous to raise and improve his subject, he has no other means than by approaching it to a general idea. He leaves out all the minute breaks and peculiarities in the face, and changes the dress from a temporary fashion to one more permanent. which has annexed to it no ideas of meanness from its being familiar to us.
Page 4 - A Painter must compensate the natural deficiencies of his art. He has but one sentence to utter, but one moment to exhibit. He cannot, like the poet or historian, expatiate, and impress the mind with great veneration for the character of the hero or saint he represents, though he lets us know at the same time, that the saint was deformed, or the hero lame.
Page 6 - Though I can by no means allow them to hold any rank with the nobler schools of painting, they accomplished perfectly the thing they attempted. But as mere elegance is their principal object, as they seem more willing to dazzle than to affect, it can be no injury to them to suppose that their practice is useful only to its proper end.

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