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User Review  - gregdehler - LibraryThing

Nationalism and the nation-state are fairly recent phenomena, dating to the 1500s. How did they come together and how has the idea of nationalism been perpetuated in the modern era? Anderson sees the ... Read full review

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"Perhaps you know this classic study, for its influence still reverberates nearly 40 years after its first edition. In it, Benedict Anderson analyses how a national identity is manufactured, so that a hunk of rock can inspire men and women to kill or die for it. Prescribed it by a university teacher a quarter-century ago, I felt the thing practically buzzing with timeliness. The Soviet imperial glacier had broken apart, and politicians and pundits assumed the world’s future lay in the nation state. Yet Anderson argued that what nationalists saw as ageless and undeniable was to scholars modern and confected. The nation, he wrote, 'is an imagined political community' – a collective waking dream fed by comparatively recent technology, such as books in the vernacular language and common consumption of the same media. Reading the same newspapers as one’s neighbours on the train or in the barbers reassured citizens that their 'imagined world is visibly rooted in everyday life'."—Aditya Chakrabortty, writing in The Guardian, Thu 17 Oct 2019 

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All reviews - 11