Historical Register

Front Cover
Containing an impartial relation of all transactions, foreign and domestick: with a Chronological diary of all the remarkable occurrences, viz. births, marriages, deaths, removals, promotions, etc. that happened throughout the year: together with the characters and parentage of persons deceased on the eminent rank ...
 

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Page 193 - And whereas no man can be forejudged of life or limb, or subjected in time of peace to any kind of punishment within this realm, by martial law, or in any other manner than by the judgment of his peers and according to the known and established laws of this realm...
Page 209 - States shall (besides such penalties as they are liable to by law), be punished according to the nature and degree of the offence, by the judgment of a regimental or general court-martial.
Page 134 - ... for them, there if the government is willing to be at the charge, they may keep the numbers up to what they please, and it is impossible to know when the parliamentary standard is exceeded and when not. Thus, therefore, stands our account : in the first place, the public is to pay...
Page 123 - Conftitution, than all the Armies of the Crown have ever done ; and that Army was the Creature of a Parliament which had eftabliih'd itfelf.
Page 127 - Turn of being uppermoft, one would think it fhould have been natural for the prevailing Party, in order to their Security, to have infifted on the Continuance of their regular Troops, at leaft for a Time. There was a Pretender to the Crown, who had a ftrong Party in the Nation, and the Government was infecure till the Spirit of Rebellion was fupprefs'd.
Page 204 - Officer, to examine into the fame by the Oath of the Parties or otherwife, and by Warrant under his or their Hands and Seals, to difcharge fuch Marine fo arrefted contrary to the Intent of this Aft...
Page 167 - His answer to these remonstrances was, that he acknowledged himself guilty in all these points; but alleged the weakness of his parts and genius, which did not permit him to apply himself to the sciences, and other functions recommended to him ; he owned himself incapable of our succession...
Page 128 - Charles the Second. But that Prince foon difbanded them, being well aware, that the fame Army which brought him in, mould their Minds change, might again turn him out. " This Objection, drawn from a Diftruft of his Majefty, deferves another Name. 'Tis an honeft, 'tis a reafonable Jealoufy of the growing Power of the Crown, which thofe that went before us always avow'd. May it not with Parity of Reafon be faid, That becaufe I will not confent, that the King...
Page 167 - Nevertheless, we continued to exhort him with a paternal affection, and joining menaces to our exhortations ; we forgot nothing to bring him back to the right way. The operations of the war having obliged us to repair to Denmark, we left him at...
Page 170 - with the king of Spain, embroil himfelf with us upon his ' account. When he faw how the cafe...

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