The Friend of Wilberforce; Sir William Jones; Reginald Heber; Sir Arthur Cotton; Sir Monier Monier-Williams

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Christian Literature Soc. for India, 1908 - Biography

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Page 113 - Blessed is the man that trusteth in the Lord, and whose hope the Lord is : For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, and that spreadeth out her roots by the river, and shall not see when heat cometh, but her leaf shall be green ; and shall not be careful in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit.
Page v - HOW happy is he born and taught That serveth not another's will; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill ! Whose passions not his masters are; Whose soul is still prepared for death, Untied unto the world by care Of public fame or private breath; Who envies none that chance doth raise...
Page 153 - Jesus stood and cried, saying ; If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. He that believeth on me, as the scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water. But this spake he of the Spirit, which they that believe on him should receive ; for the Holy Ghost was not yet given ; because that Jesus was not yet glorified.
Page 43 - On parent knees, a naked new-born child Weeping thou sat'st while all around thee smiled ; So live, that sinking in thy last long sleep, Calm thou mayst smile, while all around thee weep.
Page 156 - Those that be planted in the house of the LORD shall flourish in the courts of our God. They shall still bring forth fruit in old age ; They shall be fat and flourishing ; to shew that the LORD is upright : He is my rock, and there is no unrighteousness in him.
Page 28 - That it is the peculiar and bounden duty of the British Legislature to promote by all just and prudent means the interest and happiness of the inhabitants of the British Dominions in India; and that for these ends such measures ought to be adopted as may gradually tend to their advancement in useful knowledge and to their religious and moral improvement.
Page 71 - The two parts of which the Scriptures consist are connected by a chain of compositions which bear no resemblance in form or style to any that can be produced from the stores of Grecian, Indian, Persian, or even Arabian learning ; the antiquity of those compositions no man doubts, and the unstrained application of them to events long subsequent to their publication is a solid ground of belief that they were genuine productions, and consequently inspired.
Page 81 - FROM Greenland's icy mountains, From India's coral strand; Where Afric's sunny fountains Roll down their golden sand; From many an ancient river, From many a palmy plain, They call us to deliver Their land from error's chain.
Page 69 - I ne-» ver coiúd learn by what right, nor conceive with what feelings, a naturalist can occasion the misery of an innocent bird, and leave its young, perhaps, to perish in a cold nest, because it has gay plumage, and has never been accurately delineated, or deprive even a butterfly of its natural enjoyments, because it has the misfortune to be rare or beautiful...
Page 30 - Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding; for the merchandise of it is better than the merchandise of silver, and the gain thereof than fine gold.

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