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Ilistory of France. By E. E. Crowe. Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia

421

Poland.-Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia .

134

Humourist, The

508

Illustrations of the Annuals

550

Insect Miscellanies -- Library of Entertaining Knowledge

501

Jenour': Translation of the Book of the Prophet Isaiah, with Notes

407

Jones's, W., Ecclesiastical Ilistory

185

Jowett's Lyra Sacra

469

Musa Solitariæ, vol.

2

ib.

Juridical Letters, in reference to the present crisis of Law Reform. By Eunomus 384

Juvenile Forget-me-not

453

Souvenir

508

Keepanke, The

ib.

La Trobe on the Music of the Church

469

Lotter to ile Hon. and Rev. Baptist w. Noel on the Bible Society.

Justitia .

81

Library of Ecclesiastical Knowledge

185

Literary Intelligence

91, 184, 278,

466, 557

Souvenir, The

Lives of Eminent British Statesmen-Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia

421

75

Mackintosh's, Sir J.

, Dissertation on the Progress of Ethical Philosophy 281

Memoir of the Rev. Dr. Payson

267

Memoirs of Count Lavalette, by himself

Montagu's Ornithological Dictionary of British Birds. Edited by James Rennie,

A.M.

501

Naval and Military Bible Society. Speeches delivered at the Anniversary, 1931. 82

New Year's Gift

North American Review, No. lxxii.

384

Observations addressed to the Trinitarian Friends and Members of the Bible Society.

By a Clerical Member of the Provisional Committee

82

Parkinson's Outlines of Oryctology

l'arsons's, J., Sermons

lettet's Original Sacred Music

469

Pleasures of Benevolence, The, a Poem

Reed's Discourse on Eminent Piety essential to Eminent Usefulness

Religion in Greece; with Facts and Anecdotes

Robertson's Works, with an Account of his Life and Writings by Dugald Stewart

217

Roscoe's Landscape Annual

Scarle on the Nature, Cause, and Treatment of Cholera

Scaward's, Sir E., Narrative of his Shipwreck. Edited by Miss Jane Porter. 274

Smith's, Dr. J. P., Discourse on the Personality and Divinity of the Holy Spirit 59

Soutbey's Select Works of the British Poets, from Chaucer to Jonson

Stewart's Visit to the South Seas

537

Temple of Melekartha, The

Tooke's Diversions of Purley. Edited by Richard Taylor, F.R.S.

, &c.

273

Treatise on Silk Manufacture. Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia

421

on the Nature and Causes of Doubt.

529

Tyerman and Bennet's Journal of Voyages and Travels

. Compiled by James

Montgomery

93, 204

of

75

Waddington on the Present Condition and Prospects of the Greek, or Oriental

Church

46

Watson's

, Rev. R., Life of Wesley

349

What will the Lords do ?

359

Wilson's, J., Appeal to Dissenters on submitting to the Obligation imposed by Law,

for the Religious Celebration of Marriage

62

Winter's Wreath

453

.

453
64

.

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PAGE
History of France. By E. E. Crowe. Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia

421

Poland.-- Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia .

134

Humourist, The

508

Illustrations of the Annuals

550

Insect Miscellanies - Library of Entertaining Knowledge

. 501

Jenour's Translation of the Book of the Prophet Isaiah, with Notes

407

Jones's, W., Ecclesiastical History

185

Jowett's Lyra Sacra

469

Musæ Solitariæ, vol. 2

ib.

Juridical Letters, in reference to the present crisis of Law Reform. By Eunomus 384

Juvenile Forget-me-not

453

Souvenir.

Keepsake, The

ib.

La Trobe on the Music of the Church

469

Letter to the Hon. and Rev. Baptist w. Noel on the Bible Society. By Fiat

Justitia .

81

Library of Ecclesiastical Knowledge

Literary Intelligence

91, 184, 278, 371, 466, 557

,

508

Lives of Eminent British Statesmen Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia

421

Lyell's Principles of Geology

Mackintosh's

, Sir J., Dissertation on the Progress of Ethical Philosophy 281

Memoir of the Rev. Dr. Payson

267

Memoirs of Count Lavalette, by himself

352

Montagu's Ornithological Dictionary of British Birds. Edited by James Rennie,

A.M.

501

Naval and Military Bible Society. Speeches delivered at the Anniversary, 1831.

New Year's Gift

North American Review, No. lxxii.

Observations addressed to the Trinitarian Friends and Members of the Bible Society.

By a Clerical Member of the Provisional Committee

82

Parkinson's Outlines of Oryctology

Parsons's, J., Sermons

237

Pettet's Original Sacred Music

469

Pleasures of Benevolence, The, a Poem

315

Reed's Discourse on Eminent Piety essential to Eminent Usefulness

183

Religion in Greece; with Facts and Anecdotes

46

Robertson's Works

, with an Account of his Life and Writings by Dugald Stewart 217

Roscoe's Landscape Annual

453

Searle on the Nature, Cause, and Treatment of Cholera

64

Seaward's, Sir E., Narrative of his Shipwreck. Edited by Miss Jane Porter. 274

Smith's, Dr. J. P., Discourse on the Personality and Divinity of the Holy Spirit

Southey's Select Works of the British Poets, from Chaucer to Jonson

Stewart's Visit to the South Seas

Tooke's Diversions of Purley. Edited by Richard Taylor, F.R.s.

, &c. 273

Treatise on Silk Manufacture. Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia

421

-- on the Nature and Causes of Doubt

529

Tyerman and Bennet's Journal of Voyages and Travels. Compiled by James

Montgomery

93, 204

Ure's New System of Geology

Waddington on the Present Condition and Prospects of the Greek, or Oriental

Church

46

Watson's, Rev. R., Life of Wesley

349

What will the Lords do?

359

Wilson's, J. Appeal to Dissenters on submitting to the Obligation imposed by Law,

for the Religious Celebration of Marriage

62

Winter's Wreath

453

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THE

ECLECTIC REVIEW,

FOR JULY, 1831.

Art. I. 1. On the Constitution of the Church and State, according to

the Idea of Each ; with Aids toward a right Judgement of the late Catholic Bill. By S. T. Coleridge, Esq., R.A., R.S.L. Small 8vo.

pp. 227. Price 10s. 6d. London, 1830. 2. A Letter to his Grace the Archbishop of York, on the present

Corrupt State of the Church of England. By R. M. Beverley,

Esq. 8vo. Fifth Edition. pp. 42. Beverley, 1831. 3. Church Reform. By a Churchman. Second Edition, small 8vo.

pp. 226. London, Murray, 1830. FEW NEW writers of the present day are so capable of furnishing

• aids to reflection' as Mr. Coleridge ; but, 'aids toward a right judgement' of any question, his mode of treating things is not the best adapted to supply. What the late Mr. Hall once remarked of Dr. Owen, may with still greater propriety be applied to the Author of " The Friend,"—that he ‘dives deep * and comes up muddy.'* He is, perhaps, the most comprehensive thinker of the age, but it is a comprehensiveness fatal to distinctness; and the vague, generalized survey of a subject, which he loves to take, reminds us of a bird's eye view of a tract of country, or of the appearance of the earth from a balloon. And, if we may pursue the simile, from the elevation to

* Mr. Hall was peculiarly happy in repartee. Dr. Mason, of New York, (from whom we heard the anecdote,) was zealously expatiating on the merits of Dr. Owen as a writer :- You must at least allow,' he said to Mr. Hall, 'that Owen dives deep.' "Yes, sir,' was the reply, 'dives deep,' &c. as given above. Mr. Hall was ever ready, however, to do justice to Owen as a divine: it was to his prolix and pera plexed style only that he referred. VOL. VI.-N.S.

B

which he transports us, the misty exhalations of thought which come rolling one over another, apparently the sport of accident or impulse, but governed by unknown laws of association,--often assume forms of grandeur and beauty which delight the fancy, although they obscure or conceal the field of intellectual vision. Mr. Coleridge's habits of thought are strikingly desultory, and yet, they must be characterized as truly philosophical; and from the combination of these almost incompatible qualities results the peculiar character of his writings. He proceeds in a way the very opposite to that of some eloquent writers, who, having selected a proposition for illustration, concentrate their whole attention upon that point, lavish on it all the strength of argument, and never leave it till the theme is fairly exhausted. Mr. Coleridge, on the contrary, never closes with a subject, never comes to close quarters, but brings the artillery of his learning and eloquence to bear upon large masses.

We can hardly conceive of a more striking contrast than that which his writings present, in this respect, to those of Dr. Chalmers. The one is fond of exhibiting a simple idea in every variety of aspect, and of decorating it with multiplied illustrations, making it the central point of the shifting figures, in a manner that has been aptly compared to the effect of the objects in a kaleidoscope.' The other surrounds us with a gallery of abstractions, theories, axioms, unfinished sketches, and antique fragments, in which his own conceptions are indiscriminately blended with those of other men; where nothing is well arranged, and scarcely any thing is finished, but here, ideas present themselves roughly blocked out, and waiting for the chisel,—there, a rude sketch suggests hints for a study,-here is seen a foot of Hercules, there, a head of Juno,-here, the torso of a Church, and there, the fragments of a Constitution. Now all this is very pleasant as an exhibition, but extremely difficult to deal with. The disorderly opulence of the Author's stores of thought, by which he is himself bewildered, baffles all analysis. We are charmed with the grouping and succession of objects, but they will not fall into perspective; and when we arrive at the end, we seem as far as ever from any definite conclusion. In vain would any but the most attentive reader attempt to disentangle the complex knot of ideas laid before him in the present volume. The style of the composition itself answers to the involution of the thoughts. Digression upon digression, parenthesis within parenthesis, distinctions the most refined, transitions the most abrupt, positions the most paradoxical, keep continually the mind of the reader upon the stretch, wondering whither the erudite and accomplished Writer intends to lead him. A single sentence, taken from the volume before us, will serve to illustrate this peculiarity of the Author's mode of developing his ideas.

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