Aristotle on the Sense-Organs

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Cambridge University Press, 1997 - Philosophy - 304 pages
This book offers an important study of Aristotle's theory of the sense-organs. It aims to answer two questions central to Aristotle's psychology and biology: why does Aristotle think we have sense-organs, and why does he describe the sense-organs in the way he does? The author looks at all the Aristotelian evidence for the five senses and shows how pervasively Aristotle's accounts of the sense-organs are motivated by his interest in form and function. The book also engages with the celebrated problem of whether perception for Aristotle requires material changes in the perceiver. It argues that, surprisingly to the modern philosopher, nothing in Aristotle's description of the sense-organs requires us to believe in such changes.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Sight
23
2 The medium
116
3 Hearing
148
4 The contact senses
178
5 Smell
226
6 The actuality of perception
252
Conclusion
281
Bibliography
292
Index locorum
298
General index
302
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