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You will immediately issue the necessary orders for the moving of the bridge; detail the Thirty-fourth Illinois Infantry to assist in taking it up and help to row, if necessary, the boats to Battle Creek some 5 or 6 miles above Bridgeport. The Thirty-fourth Illinois will send its transportation with the pontoon wagons, and is a sufficient guard for its protection by wagon road to that point. On their arrival there, the Thirty-fourth will again be put in position to fully protect the bridge and other public property. Instruct the officer to notify these headquarters by telegraph as soon as the bridge has been thrown across the river at Battle Creek. The remainder of the troops will not change position for the present. I write by order of the general commanding. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. WISEMAN, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-Generał.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Crawfish Spring, September 16, 1863—8.15 a. m. Brigadier-General WAGNER,

Commanding, Chattanooga: The enemy has been re-enforced by three divisions from Lee's army. The general commanding directs you to bend every energy to the work of completing the pontoon-bridge. If the anchors are slow in coming, use car-wheels, iron rails, barrels of stone, &c., for anchors. Crowd the work to the utmost and hurry up supplies. Let us hear from you often. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD, Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Chattanooga, Tenn., September 16, 1863. General J. A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff: Yours of 8.15 a. m. is received, and the information as to re-enforcements is confirmed to-day by a person just in. He left Atlanta, Ga., last Friday. Says all the cars were sent to Augusta Thursday to convey General Ewell's corps to re-enforce General Bragg. Was reported to have from 30,000 to 32,000 troops, Jackson's old corps.

Reports from Cleveland to-day say Charleston has been evacuated. This is but rumor, but I have no doubt as to the re-enforcement from Lee. The man is very intelligent, and is a Northern man.

Will have the bridge done by the 20th, sure. Train in with about 100,000 rations. Have near 400 more wagons gone for supplies. Reports yesterday of cavalry out east turned out to be only about 50; they burned å mill at Cleveland. Colonel Byrd, of Burnside's army, said to have driven them away. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. D. WAGNER, Brigadier-General, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Crawfish Spring, September 16, 1863. COMMANDING OFFICER,

Murfreesborough, Tenn.: SIR: The general commanding is informed that a detachment of the First Regiment U.S. Colored Troops was sent to Murfreesborough to get their arms and equipments, and to get out wood at that point and Christiana for the use of the railroad, and that you refused to recognize their authority from Colonel Thompson, commanding First Regiment U. S. Colored Troops. The general commanding directs that you recognize the authority, and permit Colonel Thompson's order to be carried into effect. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. McMICHAEL, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Crawfish Spring, September 16, 1863. Mr. BEGGS,

Railroad Agent, Stevenson: Put one of the dummies at the disposal of General Stanley to take him to Nashville. He is quite sick. By order of General Rosecrans :

C. GODDARD, Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL THOMAS' HEADQUARTERS,

September 16, 1863. Col. E. M. McCOOK :

COLONEL: Move as per inclosed order from General Garfield. See inside. Come with the troops of your division you have with you, leaving Watkins at Valley Head, where he is. By order of General Mitchell :

WM. H. SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General. P. S.-Come down Rope Gap and you will have a better road here. Move cautiously. Colonel Harrison, Thirty-ninth Indiana, was up the valley yesterday. Send your train, via mountain route, to Stevens' Gap.

WM. H. SINCLAIR. P. S.-Let Stokes' battery report to General Crook when it gets up the mountain.

WM. H. SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.)
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Crawfish Spring, September 16, 1863—9.15 a. m. Brigadier-General MITCHELL,

Commanding Cavalry: The general commanding directs you to send McCook's division here, leaving such part of it as you may deem necessary to aid Gen

44 R R-VOL XXX, PT III

eral Crook in holding the Alpine route and Dougherty's Gap. Send McCook by the most direct route. Direct him to report to these headquarters in person or through a staff officer in advance of his column for orders. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD, Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Crawfish Spring, September 16, 1863—4.30 p. m. Brig. Gen. R. B. MITCHELL,

Commanding Cavalry. GENERAL : The general commanding desires you to report to-night the position of all your command. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GODDARD, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY,
DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Winston's, September 16, 1863. Colonel McCook,

Commanding First Cavalry Division: COLONEL : The general commanding directs that you move with your division to this point at once. By the time you get here the road will be clear, so you can go up the mountain. Move at 10.30 a. m., say.

Colonel Watkins' brigade will take post here and guard this valley. He will report to General Mitchell for instructions. If the men have any forage they had better take a feed with them. Take three days' rations in the haversacks. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. SINCLAIR, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY,
DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Winston's, September 16, 1863. Colonel McCOOK,

Commanding First Cavalry Division : COLONEL: The general commanding directs that you send your supply train to Stevens' Gap, with the infantry train that goes there. Bring it up here with you, and it can probably get to the top of the mountain to-night. Respectfully, yours,

WM. H. SINCLAIR, Assistant Adjutant-General.

ALLEN'S HOUSE, Four Miles from Valley Head, September 16, 1863. Col. A. P. CAMPBELL,

Commanding First Brigade : This command will move immediately; all forage parties and other detachments must be immediately called in. Three days' rations must be taken in haversacks.

Order of march : First Brigade, Second Brigade, Third Brigade. The latter will remain in station at Winston's for the present. By command of Col. E. M. McCook :

JNO. PRATT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, September 16, 1863–9.30 p. m.

(Received 12.15 a. m., 17th.) Col. J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General : In compliance with the instructions received yesterday from the General-in-Chief, I am pushing all the available force that can be spared in the department to join General Burnside. General Boyle reports the Eleventh Kentucky (mounted) Infantry ready to start, but says their arms are of six different calibers, and most of them worthless. In this emergency can I order them re-armed immediately without going through the prescribed inspection, &c.? There is a sufficient number of good arms in the ordnance department here.

W. P. ANDERSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Crawfish Spring, September 16, 1863. Maj. Gen. A. E. BURNSIDE :

The enemy, re-enforced by Johnston and Longstreet from Virginia, doubtless intend us all the mischief in their power. It is of the utmost importance that you close down this way to cover our left flank. Your cavalry ought to be in the vicinity of Tyner's now. We have not the force to cover our flank against Forrest now. He could cross the river above us before we could discover it, having to mass the three brigades [?] to cover the gaps and Will's Valley on our right and rear.

We are massed in Chickamauga Valley, from 15 to 20 miles south of Chattanooga. The enemy's main force at La Fayette and there on toward Dalton and Ringgold. He may wish to turn our left. I want all the help we can get promptly. Very respectfully,

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

CINCINNATI, September 16, 1863—8 a. m. W. P. HOLLOWAY,

Governor's Private Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. : Please send all the troops you can possibly spare, directing them to report here for further instructions. They will be sent to the front at once. It is of the utmost importance that we should have them with as little delay as possible. Please let me know when I can expect them. By order of Maj. Gen. A. E. Burnside:

W. P. ANDERSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CINCINNATI, September 16, 1863. W. P. HOLLOWAY,

Governor's Private Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. : I thank you for the general for the energy you have displayed in forwarding us troops. A good meal will be ready for them immediately upon their arrival here. I will do my best to see that your wish in regard to the regiments is carried out.

W. P. ANDERSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CINCINNATI, September 16, 1863—8 a. m. Brigadier-General BOYLE,

Louisvillé, Ky.: The general says nothing about the route to be taken. By Jacksborough, however, would be the most expeditious. I send two companies of heavy artillery to report to you by boat this morning. I will see what can be done here in the way of horse equipments, and let you

know at once. By command of Major-General Burnside:

W. P. ANDERSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CINCINNATI, September 16, 1863—10.40 p. m. Brigadier-General STURGIS,

Lexington, Ky.: In what condition is the Twelfth Michigan Battery; is it now fit to take the field ? Please answer at once. By command of Major-General Burnside :

W. P. ANDERSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CINCINNATI, September 16, 1863. General POTTER,

Headquarters Ninth Corps, Lexington: Will leave at 2 p. m.

JNO. G. PARKE,

Major-General.

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