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WINCHESTER, TENN., August 11, 1863—12.15 a. m.

(Received 11.20 a. m.) ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY:

First Division of the Fourteenth Corps moved for a point between Stevenson and Anderson. Second Division advanced to Cowan. Minty's cavalry whipped General Dibrell's brigade of rebels out of Sparta. Our loss, 1 killed and 3 mortally wounded. Enemy's loss, 10 killed and 8 prisoners. McCook's cavalry division leaves Fayetteville to-morrow for the Tennessee River, crossing the Huntsville railroad. Railroad transportation for forage deficient.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

WINCHESTER, TENN., August 11, 1863–11.30 p. m.

(Received 10.45 a. m., 12th.) ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.: The cavalry division moved to-day. Nothing further to report.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, August 11, 1863. General ROSECRANS :

I have just turned over to Col. W. P. Innes the road, with trains in position. Invoices of property will be made as rapidly as possible.

J. B. ANDERSON.

NASHVILLE, August 11, 1863. Major-General ROSECRANS :

I have the honor to report that I have just taken possession of the road, with the trains as they are in position.

W. P. INNES,

Colonel, &c.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, | HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,
No. 220.

Winchester, Tenn., August 11, 1863.

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XIV. Brig. Gen. J. B. Steedman is relieved from further duty with the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, and will report without delay to Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, commanding Reserve Corps.

XV. Brig. Gen. A. Baird is relieved from further duty with First Division, Reserve Corps, and will report without delay to Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps.

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By command of Major-General Rosecrans :

H. THRALL, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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DECHERD, August 11, 1863. Lieut. Col. G. P. THRUSTON,

A. A. G. and Chief of Staff, Twentieth Army Corps: The signal corps cannot be of any use to me at present.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

STEVENSON, August 11, 1863. General GARFIELD:

I have been waiting patiently for several days to get the tools ordered by the general to make boats and get out timber for platform. Have finally telegraphed and received the following reply:

NASHVILLE. P. H. SHERIDAN:

The articles were ready to ship on the 17th, and transportation asked for. They have not left the store-house owing to want of transportation, there having been a peremptory order not to ship this kind of goods without an order. To get these shipped immediately, you will have to get an order from chief quartermaster, Colonel Taylor.

CHAS. H. IRVIN,

Assistant Quartermaster. Please get me the order.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

Colonel TAYLOR:
The general wishes order for the shipment of these goods at once.

R. S. THOMS,

Aide-de-Camp.

WINCHESTER, August 11, 1863. Major-General PALMER,

Manchester: general commanding directs that you make the necessary arrangements for sending back to Nashville all the sick of your own and General Wood's division. Those at McMinnville can remain there for the present.

FRANK S. BOND, Major and Aide-de-Camp.

MANCHESTER, August 11, 1863. Brigadier-General GARFIELD :

General Wagner reports Payne's Cove road impracticable. The Altamont road is passable for artillery, but the best and shortest road is the Park road, the left-hand road from this place to Tracy City. Send us the counties.

JOHN M. PALMER,

Major-General.

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NASHVILLE, August 11, 1863. General GARFIELD:

General Baird has not returned; it is imperatively necessary for the First Division, Reserve Corps, to have a commander ; they need it now as much as at any time since they have been in the service. There will be enough to form a court-martial without me; cannot I be excused ?

W. C. WHITAKER, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Division.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Winchester, Tenn., August 11, 1863. Capt. H. THRALL,

Assistant Adjutant-General : CAPTAIN : I have the honor to make the following report of the condition of the artillery in the defenses of Nashville, Tenn. :

By a personal inspection made on the 11th and 17th of July, 1863, I found that the artillery of Nashville consisted of two batteries, or twelve pieces of light artillery, and twenty-eight pieces of heavy ordnance, stationed as follows: Six light and eight heavy guns stationed at Capitol building ; nine heavy pieces on the bank of the Cumberland River, on a line of defense on the east side of the city ; eleven heavy guns in Fort Negley, and a battery of six pieces camped on the outskirts of the city.

The two batteries of light artillery were in very good condition. The efficiency in the drill to which the men had arrived, their discipline, and the uniform cleanliness of their camps reflected credit upon the officers in command. They were, however, deficient in some of the implements, means to remedy which have already been taken. The condition of the siege guns was quite different; they were insufficiently manned ; deficient in ammunition and equipments. They are manned by companies raised in the light-battery organization, daily expecting to be relieved, and of course have not taken that interest in the perfection of their drill which is necessary. Means have been taken to have them supplied with the requisite amount of ammunition and with the proper equipments.

The nine pieces stationed on the bank of the river and on the east side of the city are manned by Captain Osborne's battery. He has gone to Indiana to obtain six pieces of light artillery, and is daily expected to return. When he does return, in order that his company may be instructed in the duties of field artillery, it will be necessary to have them relieved from the duty which they are now on, and there will have to be an infantry detail made to work these guns. These same guns are mounted on old worn-out marine carriages, and in case of an action a very few discharges would make them all totally unfit for use. I most respectfully suggest that an order may be issued to the ordnance department to obtain proper carriages for these guns.

The heavy guns at the Capitol building are insufficiently manned, as are also those in Fort Negley. In order to render them efficient, of some practical use, I would most respectfully suggest and urge that an infantry detail of 300 men, with the proper proportion of

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officers, be ordered to report to the chief of artillery at Nashville for assignment to duty in manning the heavy guns at that place. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. NEIL DENNISON,
First Lieut., Second U. S. Artillery, Inspector of Artillery.

[Indorsement.)
OFFICE CHIEF OF ARTILLERY,

Winchester, August 12, 1863. Respectfully forwarded, earnestly recommending that the detail of 300 men be made ; that the Twentieth Indiana Light Battery be relieved from duty on siege guns, and that proper carriages be provided by the ordnance officer; also that the service magazines be sufficiently enlarged to hold at least 100 rounds per gun.

JAMES BARNETT, Colonel, and Chief of Arty., Dept. of the Cumberland.

McMINNVILLE, TENN.,

August 11, 1863. Dr. J. D. HALE :

SIR: My information from a reliable source is that Colonel Dibrell, sent by General Forrest to White County, has directions and instructions to secure all the beef, all the wheat, and to use and destroy all the oats and corn in White

and Van Buren Counties they cannot carry off, so as to subject the Federal army to all the inconveniences possible when they come to occupy the country; and not to fight the Federals if possibly to be avoided ; and also to carry away the last horse and mule to be found in the country. In short, to devastate the country before the Federal troops can occupy it. Respectfully,

JOHN B. RODGERS.

WINCHESTER, TENN.,

August 11, 1863. Major-General BURNSIDE :

Please give me permission to send to your department, to be released from custody on oath and bonds, such captured or deserting rebels as peculiar circumstances may in my judgment render it advisable to have reside at or north of Louisville. Such persons to be sent with papers, and subject to your or General Boyle's final decision. An order to General Boyle and another to me will answer the purpose.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

WINCHESTER, TENN.,

August 11, 1863. Mr. TYLER,

Agent Associated Press, Louisville : Will you please send General Burnside's address to the general commanding? Respectfully,

CHAS. R. THOMPSON,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

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LOUISVILLE, August 11, 1863. Capt. CHARLES R. THOMPSON,

Aide-de-Camp: General Burnside has left Lexington for Camp Nelson this evening.

G. W. TYLER.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Camp, August 12, 1863. Maj. Gen. U. S. GRANT,

Comdg. Dept. of the Tennessee, Vicksburg, Miss.: The telegraph wire was put up to Haynes' Bluff and out on the Ridge road as far as Neely's at the time General Parke was there. I advise that it be extended 1 mile to Oak Ridge Post-Office where I have two regiments, commanded by Colonel Corse, Sixth Iowa. It may so happen that telegraphic

communication with that point will be of advantage, and therefore I think it advisable.

I had several persons in yesterday from as far as Brandon. Johnston has gone east, doubtless to explain matters. He still commands, and enjoys the confidence of the army and people. Hardee commands the camp at Morton. A court of inquiry is to examine Pemberton's case at Montgomery. Wirt Adams' and Starke's cavalry are west of Pearl River, and have behaved so that I have forbidden any more rations being issued to people east of Black. I have also put a picket of one regiment of infantry at Amsterdam, and sent the Second Wisconsin Cavalry, belonging to McPherson, with his approval, to Red Bone Church, to watch the crossings at Baldwin's, Hall's, and Hankinson's.

It is represented that Chalmers is coming south, toward Brandon, with his cavalry, burning cotton and gathering conscripts and negroes as he comes along. I suppose the enemy has established telegraphic communication between Brandon and Panola, but this will be broken by Colonel Winslow's cavalry, which I suppose to be now well toward Grenada. His orders are to communicate as often as possible with me or you direct. If he writes to you, please let me have the substance, that I may keep pace with his movements. I take it for granted he will reach Memphis before his return.

A man, residing near Bolton, who is, I think, in our interest, reports to me that he knows the enemy's cavalry, 8,000 strong, are to cross Pearl River to-day, in spite of the protestation of all the people. Of course, they have no 8,000 cavalry, but doubtless they wish to counteract the backsliding of the people of Mississippi. Instead of checking such a tendency they will expedite it by their cavalry.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
No. 160.

Camp near Black River, August 12, 1863. I. Pursuant to orders from department headquarters, the Thirtieth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Farrar commanding, is hereby detached from this command, and will at once move to Vicksburg, with all its equipage, sick, &c., and prepare for ship

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