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Tantalon to Bridgeport, with his headquarters at Stevenson. The brigade should be supplied with six days' rations, within which time they will be relieved by General Granger, of the Reserve Corps. When relieved, Brigadier-General King will concentrate his command at Bridgeport, where he will provide them with as many rations as can be conveniently transported, and join his division. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Bolivar Springs, August 30, 1863. Major-General NEGLEY,

Commanding Second Division: You are directed by the general commanding to move at once with your division to Bridgeport to relieve General Sheridan's division. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Stevenson, Ala., August 30, 1863—5.30 p. m. Major-General NEGLEY,

Comdg. Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps: The general commanding directs that instead of moving your division to Bridgeport you send one brigade only to Stevenson to relieve that part of General Sheridan's division now there. The balance of your division will remain where it is till further orders. General Thomas has been notified of this change in your orders. Your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD, Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. THIRD Div., FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Battle Creek, Tenn., August 30, 1863—7.15 p. m. Lieut. Col. GEORGE E. FLYNT,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff: COLONEL : I have the honor to report that the Third (Colonel Van Derveer's) Brigade has crossed the river, with the exception of Smith's battery, Fourth U. S. Artillery, which will cross during the night. My scouts have been beyond the railroad without discovering any of the rebels. I learn from citizens on the other side that our cavalry captured half of Rice's (rebel) company to-day, killing 4,

I shall move Colonel Van Derveer's brigade across the railroad to the foot of the mountain to-morrow, where there is plenty of water and forage.

The water tank on the railroad is not injured, and has a large supply of water. . I expect to get the infantry of the First Brigade across to-night. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. BRANNAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

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HDQRS. FOURTH Div., FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Jasper, August 30, 1863—8 a. m. Lieutenant-Colonel FLYNT :

COLONEL : I can now report that we have at Shellmound, ready for immediate use, seven flat-boats, another new one nearly finished, and the prospect of getting one or two more. At the present moment we are prepared to cross 400 men per hour. Batteries and wagons will consume more time, but we can cross the transportation of a regiment in half an hour. I give this last as an average, and am satisfied we can work up to it. Six of our boats will each carry a wagon and team at a trip, and one or two of them more.

Parties have been almost continually on the south side of the river in various directions since the night of the 22d, when we first took possession of the south bank of the river.

Will report to-morrow morning the result of a strong reconnaissance to Trenton, now in preparation. We can cross any number of troops at the Shellmound ferry, at the above rate, and can commence the movement at any moment. Very respectfully,

J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

August 30, 1863–12.30 p. m. General REYNOLDS :

The general commanding desires to know what means you have at your command at this time for crossing the Fourth Division. Can you throw the division across at once, with your artillery, ammunition, and subsistence, so as to send back your regimental and supply trains to Stevenson for supplies? If possible, twenty-five days' must be on hand, and transportation furnished for that amount, from the time the troops march from a point on the opposite side of the river. To meet this, surplus baggage must be left at the rear. The order for General Brannan to cross a brigade, forwarded

yesterday morning, had not reached Brannan at 6.30 last evening: Orders have been forwarded to cross to-day ; instructions in regard to sending back trains also forwarded. Instruct the trains to join you via Bridgeport, as a bridge will be thrown across there at once.

GEO. E. FLYNT, Lieut. Col., Asst. Adjt. Gen., and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. FOURTH Div., FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

August 30, 1863—2.30 p. m.

(Received 4.45 p. m.) Colonel FLYNT :

Your dispatch per signal received. Mine by courier this morning will explain means of crossing. The reconnaissance intended for Trenton will be sent to-morrow toward Chattanooga. Principal part of King's brigade will cross this evening.

J. J. REYNOLDS, Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Bolivar, August 30, 1863—4.55 p. m. General REYNOLDS :

Your dispatch just received. The general commanding directs that you cross your whole division at Shellmound ferry, following the directions forwarded this morning.

GEO. E. FLYNT. Lieut. Col., Asst. Adjt. Gen., and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., FOURTH Div., 14TH ARMY CORPS,

Foot of Mountain, Anderson Road, August 30, 1863. Lieut. Col. C. GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General : I have the honor to report that nothing of significant interest has been seen, heard, or done here since my last report. General Wagner came down the mountain yesterday with two regiments of infantry and two pieces of artillery and threw a few shell into the town and at the work, but only drew from them one shot. All is quiet in town, which indicates that everything of value has been removed.

Colonel Funkhouser, commanding detachment at Poe's Tavern, and operating against Harrison and Dallas, reports, under date of August 29, 1863, 6 p. m., as follows:

COLONEL: I have nothing of importance to report this evening. Nothing new has transpired at Harrison or Dallas. There are not more than 10 men at the two fords that can be seen. A small squad was at work at Igou's. An unusual amount of drum-beating was heard last night and this morning. The party that went to the mouth of the Chickamauga report that four guns are mounted there, and a guard of about three companies can be seen. A wagon train was visible on the road, but could not make out which way it was going, but concluded it was coming to the ferry. Some four or five teams were seen taking forage out of the valley to the hill on which the guns are planted. Two deserters came in to-day. They say they left caip at Tunnel Hill on Wednesday last. Also say that from the time we fired the first gun at Chattanooga the cars have been laden, going south, with all manner of military goods, including disabled engines and cars; and that the universal cry of the people on the other side of the river is that they are not going to fight us this side of Atlanta. Respectfully,

JOHN J. FUNKHOUSER,

Colonel, Commanding. I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. T. WILDER, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

STEVENSON, August 30, 1863. Brigadier-General LYTLE,

Bridgeport: The general commanding wishes to know if there is sufficient lumber to cover the bridge. Please send an aide to Colonel Hunton on the subject.

R. S. THOMS.

Aide-de-Camp.

BRIDGEPORT, August 30, 1863—4.40 p. m. R. S. THOMS,

Aide-de-Camp: Colonel Hunton reports he has plank sufficient to cover 1,000 linear feet of bridge.

W. H. LYTLE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Stevenson, August 30, 1863. General LYTLE,

Bridgeport: The general commanding directs that you have the ford near Bridgeport well marked on the shore and buoys placed in the water ; also fit the banks to render the approach easy

R. S. THOMS,

Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Stevenson, Ala., August 30, 1863—9.30 p. m. Brigadier-General LYTLE,

Bridgeport: A train loaded with pontoons will reach Bridgeport at 11 p. m. this evening. The general commanding directs you to make a detail to unload them as rapidly as possible. The train will then return for another load, which will reach you a little before daylight. Have you another detail to unload the second lot as soon as they arrive?

J. A. GARFIELD, Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

STEVENSON, August 30, 1863. Brigadier-General GARFIELD :

The following dispatch has been received from Bridgeport: General SHERIDAN :

Major Godley has reported he went as far as Running Water, but found no enemy except a small party of cavalry, who went back. One regiment of our infantry crossed at Battle Creek to-day. He crossed the river himself at Shellmound, and says they will be prepared to commence ferrying there in the morning. He learned from General Reynolds' assistant adjutant-general that Wilder had reported he had shelled Chattanooga yesterday morning without reply, and that the enemy had abandoned Harrison, where they had thrown up rifle-pits. The foot-bridge at the island was completed at 4 p, m. Major Godley learned from a contraband that at noon yesterday the enemy had made all preparations for abandoning Trenton, wagons loaded, &c. Lieutenant Carroll, formerly Sixth Alabama Infantry, and Petty, of Eighth Tennessee, brought in by Godley, reported that rebel cavalry told them yesterday morning two or three companies of cavalry were the only force in Chattanooga.

W. H. LYTLE,

Brigadier-General. P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

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HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS,

Stevenson, August 30, 1863. Col. B. LAIBOLDT,

Commanding Second Brigade: COLONEL : General Sheridan directs that you have your command in readiness to move to-morrow. I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

GEORGE LEE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Stevenson, Ala., August 30, 1863. Maj. Gen. T. L. CRITTENDEN:

Order has gone in cipher for you to move down secretly and quietly, leaving front as at present, with special instructions.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Stevenson, Ala., August 30, 1863—10 p. m. Major-General CRITTENDEN,

Comdg. Twenty-first Army Corps, Dunlap, Tenn.: GENERAL : The general commanding directs you to move your entire command (except the brigades of Hazen and Wagner) as soon as practicable down the Sequatchie Valley. Supply yourself with everything necessary for an active campaign. Your trains can cross the Tennessee at Bridgeport, and your troops at Bridgeport, Shel.mound, or Battle Creek. Reynolds is now crossing at the latter place. McCook's corps is crossing at Bridgeport and below. Leave Generals Hazen and Wagner where they now are, with orders to watch carefully the crossings of the river and show a threatening front to the enemy in that direction. Wilder's and Minty's brigades will remain there to co-operate with them. The present indications are that Bragg will fall back from Chattanooga, and if we bring him to battle at all it will be between Dalton and Atlanta. Should he thus fall back, direct Wagner and Hazen to cross the river and occupy Chattanooga, and close down upon our left. It is very important to seize the enemy's pontoons at Chattanooga, if possible. Keep open communication below your whole line and with these headquarters.

J. A. GARFIELD, Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff.

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HDQRS. FIRST BRIGADE, SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

Smith's Cross-Roads, Tennessee Valley, August 30, 1803. Lieut. Col. LYNE STARLING,

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Twenty-first Army Corps : SIR: My topographical engineer is now in Pennsylvania on leave of absence. I therefore cannot give General Crittenden the sketch he asks for.

Dowdy's (or Doughty's) Ferry is about 2 miles below Blythe's.

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