Sea-side Walks of a Naturalist with His Children

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Groombridge and Sons, 1870 - Electronic book - 154 pages
 

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Page 150 - SEE what a lovely shell, Small and pure as a pearl, Lying close to my foot, Frail, but a work divine, Made so fairily well With delicate spire and whorl, How exquisitely minute, A miracle of design ! 2 What is it ? a learned man Could give it a clumsy name.
Page 61 - I have seen A curious child, who dwelt upon a tract Of inland ground, applying to his ear The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell; To which, in silence hushed, his very soul Listened intensely; and his countenance soon Brightened with joy; for from within were heard Murmurings, whereby the monitor expressed Mysterious union with its native sea.
Page 27 - Bank the mid sea : part single, or with mate, Graze the sea-weed their pasture, and through groves Of coral stray, or sporting with quick glance Show to the sun their waved coats dropt with gold...
Page 94 - Almighty's form Glasses itself in tempests; in all time, — Calm or convulsed, in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime Dark-heaving — boundless, endless, and sublime, The image of eternity, the throne Of the Invisible; even from out thy slime The monsters of the deep are made; each zone Obeys thee; thou goest forth, dread, fathomless, alone.
Page 126 - As when fire is with water commix'd and contending, And the spray of its wrath to the welkin upsoars, And flood upon flood hurries on, never ending ; And it never will rest, nor from travail be free, Like a sea that is labouring the birth of a sea.
Page 112 - But what our eyes have seen and our hands have touched we shall declare. There is a small island in Lancashire called the ' Pile of Foulders,' wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by...
Page 112 - Bird : when it is perfectly formed the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace or string ; next come the legs of the bird hanging out, and as it groweth greater it openeth the shell by degrees...
Page 112 - ... finely woven as it were together, of a whitish colour; one end whereof is fastened unto the inside of the shell, even as the fish of...
Page 123 - As it does not generally break up before it is raised above the surface of the sea, cautiously and anxiously I sunk my bucket to a level with the dredge's mouth, and proceeded in the most gentle manner to introduce Luidia to the purer element. Whether the cold air was too much for him, or the sight of the bucket too terrific, I know not, but in a moment he proceeded to dissolve his corporation, and at every mesh of the dredge his fragments were seen escaping.

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