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PRINTED BY SAMUEL TYMMS,

60, HIGH STREET, LOWESTOFT.

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HONORARY SECRETARY AND TREASURER TO THE SUFFOLK INSTITUTE OF ARCHÆOLOGY, &c.

VOL. II.

LOWESTOFT:
SAMUEL TYMMS, 60, HIGH STREET.

LONDON:

WHITTAKER AND CO., AVE MARIA LANE.

1866.

Dunning

Hunt 414-41 42467

THE EAST ANGLIAN.

JANUARY, 1864.

THE HERALDIC VISITATION OF SUFFOLK.

The Publisher desires to express his deep regret that he has been unable to complete his arrangements in time for issuing the first part of the Heraldic Visitation of Suffolk with this No. of the East Anglian, and to beg the kind indulgence of the Subscribers, for postponing its appearance till the first of March.

NOTES.

GARANTRE AND GERNETRE (vol. 1., pp. 418, 438). I am inclined to think that both Mr. Charnock and myself have missed the true explanation of this curious local name. Of course, my supposition that it was derived from the pomegranate, implied the further supposition that, like the graintree, the pomegranate was an armorial bearing of some person connected with the weir. It was an heraldic bearing; and as many of our landed gentry had, or at least claimed to have, a South European origin, they might very naturally bear it as a crest.

But I cannot trace any family to that neighbourhood who carried it.

As regards "gwern," the Welsh for alder, besides the improbability of a Welsh word remaining as a name of a weir, so far east: I think that in Herefordshire and Salop, where several places retain names from the Welsh, "gwern” has invariably been Anglicised to "wern.

" In Danish and Swedish, “gern ;” and in Dutch,“ garen” (the English "yarn," A.S. “ gearn”), are used in the secondary sense of “net.” So Yarmouth fishermen call old net “lint." I now suggest that “ gerntre'

“garentre,” was a tree on which nets were hung to dry.-E. G. R.

or

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CHURCHWARDENS' ACCOUNTS. The extracts you have lately published from the Church wardens' Accounts of Bungay, communicated by Mr. G. B. Baker, contain many entries of very considerable interest, more particularly those which relate to bookbinding, and the changes in religion; but there are several words in them the explanation of which would render them more useful. As a contribution to that object, may I beg you to accept the following remarks.

P. 375. iij laddys surplyce. I understand this as " three lads' surplices,”—the surplices of three boys, either choristers, or the youthful attendants on the priests.

It'm. pay de to Rob’it Man for maky'ng of A slok for ye sacryng belle iiijd. Should not · Rob'it' and 'Rob'it Hunne,' afterwards, be Robert ? The stok' of the sacring bell was its handle. •Pateyn nayle,' qu. what kind of nails ?

P. 376. Y e supporesse.—Of course, the sub-prioress of the priory of Bungay, though as printed it may not strike every reader. A fyrl syrplesse, what is ‘fyrl'?

P. 423. It'm payd on to Fyschepond for mendyng the feayers on the porche and other reparacioris in the cherche, xjd.—This small sum, one would think, would do very little for finials or stone figures in niches, which are suggested in the note. Fishpond's name occurs again in p. 425, as mending the cross that stood in the churchyard : so he seems to have been a mason; or, was he a plumber? Feayers,' must be read as feathers : and possibly that term might be applied to pinnacles or finials of a feathery appearance. Cloffers for the bookscovers ? To herry Rop ffor Ekyn of a Belropperead Harry Roper, a man going by the name of his trade.

P. 424. The correkyn of the service of Thomas Becket, is to be read "correcting," and understood it may be presumed as altogether cancelling ; and the transposing of the stained cloths, upon which the murder of Becket was represented, was perhaps turning them, so as to offer to view their reversed surface.

It. to Will'm Allgor for xxvj yerds off lokeram p'a (?) ye yard vjd. ijd. abalyd in ye sum xijs. xd. This I can explain. The lockram was a cloth generally described as something not very different from buckram. The next word should be printed “p'c.” denoting its price by the yard ; and the meaning of the rest is, that twenty-six yards at 6d. would have amounted to 138.; but, as 2d. was abated, the sum was only 128. 10d.

Mendyng ye coffyns for ye berys. The berys are probably the biers, as in the extracts from the churchwardens' books of Weybread (p. 411) “ for mending the bere or herse." In the year 1539, the date of the Bungay entry, I imagine that it was still the common practice to bury in a shroud, without a coffin ; but the biers or stands prepared for the carriage of the dead, would have coffins fixed upon them, to receive the bodies, during their transit to the grave.

It. to bot'mi for hallff A hundryd plank, ijs. vid. : It for viij ffoote in A noy plank and ffor x foote of hokyn bord ffor the mendyng off the berys, viijd.

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