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Father, hold thou my hands;

265 I come at morn when dew-drops bright,
Fatigued by numerous calls of late,

294
I do not know why even yet

259
Fear not, Abraham, saith the Lord,

I do not love thee--no! I do not love thee! 347
Flaunting the tinsel of shame
43 I dreamed last night that I had died,

54
For days and weeks upon the lips has hung, 143 If by a wish I could withdraw,

54
Forests that once were so dear,

I fear thee, ancient Mariner!

219
For the bounteous gifts of Heaven

403
If ever dear,

286
For thee was always my awakening thought, 329 I found a woman white and pure and cold; 275
For the faith that is not broken

381

If I could live without the thought of death
For this the fruit, for this the seed,

If I could only count, my love

196
“Forward !” cried the brave Pulaski,

96
If I might choose my meeting-time,

107
Four rounded centuries have rolled,
234 If in the viewless haunts of time

357
Freemen extol your Washington,
85 If is a word born of sad human doubt,

176
Friend, thou and I had known each other long 105 If I were only young.

235
Friend, whom thy fourscore winters,

105

If the sudden tidings came
From child to youth; from youth to arduous If this were a fairy gift dear,

374
man;
If thou dost bid thy friend farewell,

312
From that far land, beloved.
24 If thou, O friend, canst say

105
From the time of our old Revolution

If thou shalt be in heart a child,

286
From this far realm of pines

106
I gave that earnest love of mine

193
Full, broad and bright is the silver light 372 I grew assured before I asked,

312
“Gentle, modest little flower,

62 I had a haunting thought at Easter-tide, 151
Get thee behind me. Even as heavy-curled

385
I have a bright idea, lassie,

175
Give me the rest of faith,
214 I have honestly tried to love her

66
Glad sunshine clothes the world to-day,
206 I have my own ambition.

369
Gone over the border land

I hold before me, in weak trembling hands, 242
Gone the ripple and the rushes

I know a nook, a sunny nook,

55
Go where I may by night or day
294 “I know what your poem will be,"

59
Great ruler in the realm of thought,

I lay dreaming, my soul filled with music 188
Hail Columbia ! happy land !

95
I lay me down before the rustic gate

306
Hail, Freedom! Thy bright crest
415 I lived alone within a mighty city

353
Half a league, half a league,

31 I long have had a quarrel set with time, 401
Hark! I hear the tramp of thousands,
233 I loved her too, this woman who is dead.

396
Hark, my soul! it is the Lord;

236 I love to wander through the woodlands hoary, 283
Hark! what's that?—a sound I hear!
282 I love you, love you! love you!

236
Has the trampled slave arisen,
310 I'm a sprite from the depth of a spring,

239
Have I shattered thee O Beautiful! Thou I'm mad, mad, mad, I know but this-

154
Christ-child pale and pure
262 I'm no reformer, for I see more light

272
Hear the sledges with the bells,
132 In a dirty old house lived a dirty old man;

298
Heart-worn and weary the woman sat
237 In and out, out and in,

41
He is the despots' Despot. All must bide. 414 In a sunny nook of a sunny room,

213
He is the friend of friends. In his chill hand. 415 In Dixville woods a lone grave lies,
He looks at me from out the velvet frame, 271 In sad sweet days when hectic flushes,
Help to a soul in need,
44 In spring we plough the field

205
He never said he loved me;

288 In summer nights, when Philomel's despair 391
Her blue eyes they beam and they twinkle,

300
In the early dawn of the morning

194
Here 'mid these paradises,
96 Into the gloom of the summer night,

72
Her summer days are gone,
60 In the quiet of the evening,

1.10
He who hath loved hath borne a vassal's chain, 267 In the smoke of my dear cigarito

310
He who is always gay is oft in danger,
294 Into the silence of the silent night

104
High grace, the dower of queens

386
“In to the sunshine out of shade!"

150
High-niched within the temple,

59 In vain for him the buds shall burst,
How beautiful the night!

18 I ought to be joyful, the jest and the song 372
How beautiful this earth my love,
212 I passed it yesterday again,

151
How beautiful to live as thou didst live
237 Ireland! Mother unknown,

374
How can I wait until you come to me?
273 I remember, I remember,

190
How like an Alexander now he stands
190 I sat with Doris, the shepherd maiden:

324
How long will ye round me be swelling, 219 | Is aught so sweet as is this faded rose ?
How much do I love you ?
170 I saw a diamond glistening:

156
How nice it is when men must rave
395 “I saw him kiss your cheek!"

312
How tenderly about earth's russet breast, 172 “I shall be happy,!” she said,

49
Hush-my little baby sweet,
282 I sit beneath the apple-tree

380
Hylas, Hylas, where art thou!

214 Is it best to be one of a garden of flowers, 60
I am Merlin, and I am dying,
102 I sought to learn the cause of things,

176
I am sitting alone in the twilight,
So I stood upon the ocean's brink

172
I am so happy, dear, when I am near you; 238 I strove for wicked peace but might not win; 300
I am thinking of thee to-night love
282 It belongs to other years,

169
I ask thee not, O Lord, for rest-

ISI
I tell ye jest what, them teachers

402
I cannot choose but think upon the time 249 I tell you hopeless grief is passionless,

163

392
238

109

202

202

40

78

416

366

256

328
316

98

II

298
358

I thank thee Father, for thy care,

74
I think if I should cross the room,

381
I think if I were dying,

208
It seems so strange,

107
It was many and many a year ago,

137
I've a mother in ould Ireland,

392
I walk, I trust, with open eyes;

312
I wander in a city, tranquil, fair,
I wonder, sometimes, in the darkness,

281
“I would be great, O Lord!"

176
Jenny kissed me when we met,
Joy took up the harp of life,

177
Just seventy years ago,
Just when all dusky and dreary,

146
Keep a stout heart friend, though fortune may
frown;

291
Lady Clare Vere de Vere.

30
Land of the pine and cypress, where the shades
Last night beside my hearthstone,
Laugh, and the world laughs with you;

272
Let me see! It was May, for an oriole came

363
Let not the drifted snow of lilies white

363
Let the storms beat of Fate and Circumstance-278
“Let us hush this cry of forward till,
Life and thought have gone away.

32
Life is too short, its days too few

170
Like a blind spinner in the sun
Like skyward sparks our souls aspire,

38
Like the violet, which alone

325
Like to a stately palm

199
Like to the clear in highest sphere

324
Listen, my children, and you shall hear 230
Long years ago I wandered here,

329
Love does not always heal with balm
Love is not a feeling to pass away,

256
Love is the center and circumference;

273
Love not, love not, ye hapless sons of clay! 347
Loving little brownie, darling,
Lo, when the Lord made North and South, 311
Low was our pretty cot!

218
Maid of Athens, ere we part,

324
Majestic mother of a hero-race!

391
Man were too mighty for this sphere,

160
Maud Muller on a summer's day,
Midnight by the chapel bell!
Month of the season's garnered gold,

214
Moonbeam and night

354
Mother I see you, with your nursery light,
My books beloved, ye take me backward,
My country,-'tis of thee,

108
My lady's rest was calm and deep;

190
My little girl with fluttering heart,

138
My love sings like the mavis,

28
My own dear lad, my wee bit lad,

42
My tribute lay, a sweet bouquet

408
My work is done; the eventide is here

419
Natur' the good old schoolmarm who pities our
distress

353
Ne'er did singing by its flattering art

297
Ne'er subject bowed before the royal throne, 40
Never alone again since I have found

363
Night! And the great sea seems to beat, 310
No moaning on the bar; sail forth,

103
"No more, no more," the autumnal shadows
cry;

287
No song was ever heard,

23
No splendor 'neath the sky's proud dome 312
Not always thus! Not always thus,

358

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame, 379
Not rich are we in hoarded gold.

171
Not while the fever of the blood is strong 379
Now fare-you-well! My bonny ship,

299
Now mark the contrast in a woman's heart 177
Now, that you come no more to me,

373
O better the glimpse of a star

408
October! Why do I this month adore ?
O Dartmouth's Melpomene, gracefully green!
O'er mountains and meadows,

24
O fair bird, singing in the woods,

285
Of all the sweet names that ever were given

267
Oft as we turn we catch the gleam

78
Oft have I brooded on defeat and pain,

379
O genial John! beneath the shade,

77
O gentle death, bow down and sip

334
O gleaner, who homeward, as if in retreat, 48
Oh a dainty plant is the ivy green,
O happy bee, so heavy-laden, fly!

172
O haunting shade that fitted down the past 268
“Oh brew me a potion strong and good! 379
O, he lightly swings his gleaming scythe 53
Oh fair to be, oh sweet to be

286
Oh flower of spring that lingered here to cheer 403
Oh God who by thy Prophet's hand,

256
Oh great grey waves that bellow to the shore 261
Oh! if the winds could whisper what they hear, 347
Oh! leave the past to bury its own dead, 398
Oh! let it never more be said,

84
Oh, lovely Mary Donnelly, it's you I love the

best!
Oh, pallid phantom of a joyous summer day
Oh! pity me dolly.

39
Oh p'raps you may have heard,

255
Oh radiance mine when day is o'er!

201
Oh, say, can you see by the dawn's early light 225
Oh, stars that guard the outer walls of heaven, 276
Oh the dear, dead days that sleep,

50
Oh, these rondeaus and triolets are pretty as
violets

354
Oh, thought that is deeper and vaster

155
O lady mine! O lady of my life!

330
Older my realm than other known

161
O life! so dark, so bright, so evanescent,

17
O, little clouds how swift
O, masters! your sweet singer lieth here- 333
O may I join the choir invisible

249
O mother of a mighty race,

226
On a brown and sheltered hillside,

206
Once again the leaves are falling,

138
Once, in the dark, I knew a rose was near 374
Once upon a midnight dreary,
One day, one day, our lives shall seem

286
One night, like a jockey contesting a race 55
O Nightingale! that fills the air with song,
Only a bit of lace,
Only a whisper, but that whisper fell

288
Only the hum of the distant bees

42
O Northern pole

292
Onward, still on the grave is yawning,

86
O poet, crowned with songs,
O, radiant guest, who, decked in garments fair, 268
O restful, silent tomb!

161
O Tennyson! Of poets loved the best;
O thrush, your song is passing sweet,

287
Our good steeds snuff the evening air,

229
Out from the mossy earth, with drip and trickle 365
Out of the South, where dainty heaps of cloud 27
O! vast unmeasured bound-

241

182

201

326
248

12

200

I 28

338
I2

202

102

212

266

IO

316

22

348

305
238

Over the clover math

300

The children robed in spotless white
O wild red rose what mind has stayed.

The circus of to-day I deem a wondrous sort
O World in tears, thy Christ lies in the tomb! 182

of thing.

336
Padre. As on we go,

97
The clouds, the beautiful clouds!

154
Peace in the clover-scented air,
228 The dawn of new ages is breaking,

335
Peeping round the world so novel,

77 The day had dawned! The lucent mist 261
Poet believed, again I come,

199 The day is dying. In the western sky,
Poor lone Hannah
150 The day was black with clouds,

143
Push back the curtains and Aing wide the door; The dews are dry upon my sandal-shoon

3
369 The east glowed like a blush rose fair,

28
Quench not the fires which burn within the soul The fallen cause still waits, -

227
260 The fault of the age is a mad endeavor

272
Quoth Nelly “the will of the Lord be done,” 84 The flowers of thought, with their divine per-
Ring all thy lily bells, thy royal colors fly, 363

fume,

277
Savior, thy dying love,

The forests have a hoary look,

303
Shakespeare, thou hast nodded too,
47 The Frost-King lays his icy hand

205
Sharp are the thrusts,

106 The glorious movement heaven-aspiring flies, 375
She comes no more,
24 The great big church waz crowded

351
She is here in all her glory,
193 The heart of woman! Who shall read

160
She is my Queen-though not of royal line; 238 The house was packed from pit to dome, 240
She laid in his hand a tangled thorn

265 The immortal beauty of God's simple things 390
She sits among the eternal hills,

410
The jewel'd water stretched,

166
She's so sweet and meek and lowly,

297
The June is sweet with rose and song,

113
She stood breast-high amid the corn,
327 | The lark that thrills us with its song,

74
She wove her life of myths and dreams, 407 | The laurels fall from off as high a brow, 104
Silent and mute the harp of love
44 The long and weary hours,

67
Silent companions of the lonely hour,

348

The mind that journeys into realms ideal 278
Sing for the garish eye,
65 The morn breaks gloriously.

29
Six years ago, O autumn rain,
208 The morning May-beams,

233
Sleep, Sorrow sleep!

305

The mother looketh from her latticed pane-
Slow from the west the sunbeams

196 The mountains have a peace which none dis-
Slowly I circle the dim, dizzy stair,

turb.

371
Slumberous depths of tired eyes,

The musk-rose, love, is sweetest now,

59
Soft languor lies upon the hill,

68
The noisy day was over,

337
So it is, my dear.
385 The prettiest picture that I

191
Solemn and still on the outward wind
208 There are boundless chasms in time

170
Some ask'd me where the rubies grew,

325

There are days that come and go,
Some days there are.
66 There are those who grow prosaic.

67.
Some flowers bear violets on their bosom 265 There are wrongs done in the fair face of
Some men are reason-proof,

Heaven
So plump dimple-dented,

41 There be two messengers that come to me, 24
Sparrows are piping, the bold robins sing, 169 There is a smile angelic in the sea,

297
Speak, for thy servant heareth;

413
There is enchantment in the thought

419
Spring to thy wings bright lark of the meadow 182 There is no chance, no destiny, no fate, 273
Star of the eastern sky,
107 There is no laughter in the natural world

398
Statesman, yes! tho' cold and lowly.
18 There on top of the down,

109
Stranger than aught on earth,

177
There's a song in my heart,

42
Sunset and evening star,

32 There's not a breath of summer's joy and
Sweet “Forget-me-not

217
glory

374
Sweet guardian of the storehouse of the mind 196 There's thet black abomernation, thet big
Sweetheart, to you all things are clear,

108
locomotive there,

352
Tears! Tears! Tears!
187 There was a man, it was said one time,

273
Tell me not, sweet, I am unkinde,

323

The robin chants when the thrush is dumb, 241
Thank God, bless God.

163 The saddest hour of anguish and of loss 274
Thank Heaven! the crisis-

134

The school is closed! the books are laid away. 211
That man is wisest who accepts his lot,
369 The shortest absence brings

IO
The apple trees are laden’d with blossoms to- The sky and the sea like two nuns

316
day
182 The solemn sea of silence is unbroken,

44
The army is gathering from near and far; 231 The spirit of the summer night

78
The artist culls from wood and glade,
217 The springtime's promise in the air,

271
The auctioneer leaped on a chair, and bold

The star-tecked robe that wraps,

173
and loud and clear

352
The summer hath kissed the winter

78
The bishop was genial and burly,

The summers change us,

260
The blessed damozel leaned out

383 The sun has gone down o'er the lofty Benlo-
The breath of a soft wing

364

mond,
The brightest star in Britain's sky,

The test of labor is what stays!
The brook is frozen from bridge

166 The time drew near that our ling'ring feet, 43
The camp is astir and the men muster fast, 189 The true Messiah came to earth,

277
The child and the old man sat alone

259 The unseen fingers of the air

170

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336

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The wars are ended, and soft brooding peace 97
The waves of sleep roll up the strand of night, 271
The wind sounds only in opposing straits, 163
The woman singeth at her spinning-wheel 163
The women who went to the field,

231
The woods are bare,

50
The world is great! the birds all fly from me, 247
They told me I was heir.

9
Tho’ bent to earth and almost broke,

77
Thou art gone to the grave,

236
Though palace grand or humble cot,
Thou limpid stream, that laughing flows,

139
Thou who walked in those old days

240
Through dreamy days in autumn woods

27
Through the day, when the children,

53
Through the grey and frosty heavens,

297
Thus childlike, “I am going home,”

237
'Tis not in self-abasement.
'Tis sweet to hear, in pensive hours,
'Tis the blithest, bonniest weather for a bird to
flirt

• 306
To be a sweetness more desired than spring;
To die is but to live again

292
To her, who caught mine earliest sigh,
“ Too commonplace!” the critic hath averred, 235
Too frail, too false, too faithless,

139
To the beloved sound I listen
'Twas a beautiful harp!

207
'Twas 'mongst the hop-vined glens of Kent 293
'Twas night! I wondered how I'd breast 207
'Twas on the shores that round our coast, 61
Two cities dwell within thy shadowy eyes, 106
Two lovers by a moss-grown spring!

248
Two sons from out two distant homes,

49
Under the trees in the apple orchard,

23
Up from the meadows rich with corn,

225
Up from the South at break of day,

5
Upon a mossy bank I lie,
Upon the branches serpents lie;

71
Upon the silver beach the undines dance

379
Use thy power unto the uttermost,

175
Weepeth the rain, beloved one,

276
We have been friends together,
We lavish our lives in getting,

84
We look into to-morrow,

49
We loved, indeed we did.

175
We nurse our hopes as mothers do

83
We read of thee in sacred story,

407
We sat at twilight nigh the sea,

376
We shall lodge at the Sign o' the Grave, you
say!

339
We stand and look the ages in the face,
We were two daughters of one race,

31
We would stay on this high mount.

181
What, -Barret dead ? How soon life's play
is o'er

235
What hast thou done to this dear friend of
mine,

379
What is a sonnet? 'Tis a little bell

293
What is this world, the great wide world, 407
What lacks the summer?

373
Whence comes my love? O heart, disclose; 323

When Dante following the elder poet,

194
When first I looked into thy glorious eyes, 284
When Freedom from her mountain height 226
When hope is lost,

160
When I am dead, strew roses o'er me, sweet

363
When I walk out beneath the starry skies, 54
When life is darkest, then ofttimes I feel

282
When Nature wreathed her rosy bowers,

15
When our delight is desolate,

371
When russet apples turn

172
When the merry April morn,

144
When salutes the waves Pacific

292
When sleep shall close each weary lid.

139
When sinks the sun in western sky,

304
When some belovéd voice,

162
When suddenly there passes,

49
When summer, like an elfin queen,

16
When the swift spider weaves

389
When the twilight gathers lonely and I sit
within the gloom,

357
When Titan reins his fiery steed,

39
When you and I shall stand,

79
Where art thou, thou lost face,

396
Where Claribel low-lieth,

32
Where did you find little maiden fair,

170
Where dost thou linger while we wait for thee 268
While icy winds do pierce me

144
While I stand on one of her seven hills,
While the dull Fates sit nodding at their loom, 284
While waiting for the lily.

38
Who knows the inmost heart of the rose,
Who shall catch his falling mantle,

177
Why did He weep,

195
Why do I love thee? Do you ask me this? 271
Why do we fret at the inconstancy

398
Why I love you? Tell me first

171
Why is it true that all the golden fruit,

268
Will you come with me, my own love?

18
Wise in her daily work was she

297
Within his sober realm of leafless trees,

4
Within its border land I long did wait
Within my humble hall there hangs

278
Without I stand, timid and trembling still 339
With retrospective thought I sit

404
With stammering lips,

163
Woman, this dream, thy love, is dead.

160
Woods, waters, have a charm to soothe the
ear,

335
Word was brought to the Danish King
Wrapped in the cold, silver mist so white,
Years to a century had grown,

108
Ye banks, and braes, and streams around 323
Yes, law is a great thing, but justice comes in
ahead

359
Yes Marie! all child, all woman,

187
Yes. Thou art everywhere!

271
Yonder from a vine-clad dwelling

205
You ask me, “Do you think of me?"
Young when the world was young, Antigone 260
Youth quickly tires of calm retreats,
Youth was led by hope,

202

201

213

348

346
316

395

318

278

358

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