Varronianus: A Critical and Historical Introduction to the Ethnography of Ancient Italy and to the Philological Study of the Latin Language

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J. W. Parker & Son, 1852 - Ethnology - 476 pages
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Contents

They preserve their national integrity in Etruria
11
The ETRUSCANSthe authors theory respecting their origin
14
The names ETRUSCUS and RASENA cannot be brought to an agreement with TYRSENUS
16
It is explicitly stated by ancient writers that the Etruscans came from Rætia
17
This view of the case is after all the most reasonable
18
It is confirmed by all available evidence and especially by the contrast between the town and country languages of Etruria
19
Farther inferences derivable from a the traditionary his tory of the Luceres
21
6 Fragmentary records of the early constitution of Rome
23
c Etymology of some mythical proper names
24
General conclusion as to the mutual relations of the old Italian tribes
26
CHAPTER II
28
How tho Pelasgians came into Europe
30
Gothic or LowGerman affinities of the ancient Etruscans shown by their ethnographic opposition to the Veneti
66
Reasons for comparing the old Etruscan with the Old Norse
68
Old Norse explanations of Etruscan proper names
69
Contacts and contrasts of the Semitic and the Sclavonian
72
Predominant Sclavonism of the old Italian languages
74
58
84
SECT PAGB
89
Umbrian words which approximate to their Latin synonyms
99
59
101
64
106
68
107
69
111
The Bantine Table
116
The Cippus Abellanus
127
CHAPTER V
139
Alphabetical list of Etruscan words interpreted
151
Etruscan Inscriptionsdifficulties attending their interpre
165
Inscriptions containing the words SUTHI and TRCE
174
The great Perugian Inscription critically examinedits Runic
180
Harmony between linguistic research and ethnographic tra
189
CHAPTER VI
193
Arvalian Litany
194
72
196
Fragments of Salian hymns
197
Old regal laws
200
Remains of the XII Tables
203
Table II
205
Table III
207
Table IV
208
Table V
209
Table VI
210
Table VII
212
Table VIII
214
Table IX
217
Table X
218
Table XI
219
The Tiburtine Inscription
220
The Epitaphs of the Scipios
222
The Columna Rostrata
229
The Silian and Papirian laws and the Edict of the curule Ædiles
230
The SenatusConsultum de Bacchanalibus
232
The old Roman law on the Bantine Table
234
CHAPTER VII
238
The labials
239
The gutturals
245
The dentals
255
The vowels
260
The accusative singular
283
The ablative
284
The vocative
286
Adverbs considered as cases of nouns
287
Adverbial expression for the day of the month
292
CHAPTER IX
293
General rules for the classification of Latin nouns
294
First or a Declension
295
Second or 0 Declension
296
A First class or purely consonantal nouns
297
B Second class or semiconsonantal nouns
301
CHAPTER X
307
23
308
Indicative Pronouns
310
Distinctive Pronouns
315
Relative interrogative and indefinite Pronouns
318
Numerals and Degrees of Comparison
327
Prepositions
329
THE UMBRIAN LANGUAGE AS EXHIBITED IN THE EUGUBINE TABLES 78
334
Negative particles
337
2
341
Doctrine of the Latin tenses
343
The substantive verbs
345
Paucity of organic formations in the regular Latin verb
350
General scheme of tenses in the Latin verb
351
Verbs which may be regarded as parathetic compounds
352
Tenses of the vowelverbs which are combinations of the same kind
353
Organic derivation of the tenses in the consonant verb
355
The modal distinctionstheir syntax
356
Forms of the infinitive and participlehow connected in derivation and meaning
359
The gerundium and gerundivum shown to be active and present 361
365
The past tense of the infinitive active
369
CHAPTER XII
372
The first or a conjugation
373
The second or e conjugation
377
guished
378
The third or i conjugation
382
The fourth or consonant conjugation A Mute verbs
384
B Liquid verbs
388
Semiconsonantal verbs
390
Irregular verbs A Additions to the present tense
391
B Abbreviated forms
397
Defective verbs
399
CHAPTER XIII
400
Derivation is merely extended or ulterior inflexion
401
403
402
6 Forms with the second Pronominal Element only
403
c Forms with the third Pronominal Element only 7 a Terminations compounded of the first and other Prono minal Elements
405
B Terminations compounded of the second and other Pronominal Elements
406
The Sibilants
413
y The third Pronominal Element compounded with others and reduplicated
417
Derived verbs
419
B Composition Discrimination of compound words
424
Classification of Latin compounds 406
426
CHAPTER XIV
432
Tab I a 1
433
79
461
83
462

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Page 214 - Occentassint antiqui dicebant quod nunc convitium fecerint dicimus, quod id clare, et cum quodam canore fit, ut procul exaudiri possit. Quod turpe habetur, quia non sine causa fieri putatur.
Page 451 - Pro Deo amur et pro christian poblo et nostro commun salvament, d'ist di in avant, in quant Deus savir et podir me dunat, si salvarai eo cist meon fradre Karlo, et in...
Page 427 - The meat was served up by watchwords. Jacks are but of late invention. The poor boys did turn the spits, and licked the dripping for their pains.
Page 161 - Forma autem vocabuli ejus, exemplo multorum populorum Italicorum enuntiata est, quod post diem quintum iduum est is dies festus, ut aput Tusculanos Triatrus et Sexatrus et Septimatrus et Faliscos Decimatrus.
Page 114 - aurora dicitur ante solis ortum, ab eo quod ab igni solis turn aureo aer aurescat.
Page 158 - Tusco verbo ludio vocabatur, nomen histrionibus inditum; qui non, sicut ante, Fescennino versu similem incompositum temere ac rudem alternis iaciebant sed impletas modis saturas descripto iam ad tibicinem cantu motuque congruenti peragebant.
Page iii - Varronianus. A Critical and Historical Introduction to the Ethnography of Ancient Italy, and to the Philological Study of the Latin Language. By the late JW DONALDSON, DD Third Edition, revised and considerably enlarged. 8vo. 16».
Page 214 - The English law makes a similar provision respecting rabbit-burrows. Fr. 1 1 (vi. 4). § 1, 41, i. de Rer. Dims. : " Venditae vero res et traditae non aliter emptori adquiruntur, quam si is venditori pretium solverit, vel alio modo satisfecerit, veluti expromissore, aut pignore dato. Quod cavetur quidem et lege xi1. Tab., tamen recte dicitur et jure gentium, ie jure naturali, effici.
Page 113 - Aureliam familiam ex Sabinis oriundam a Sole dictam putant, quod ei publice a populo Romano datus sit locus, in quo sacra faceret Soli ; qui ex hoc Auseli dicebantur, ut Valesii, Papisii pro eo quod est Valerii, Papirii.
Page 208 - Erat autem ius interea paciscendi ac, nisi pacti forent, habebantur in vinculis dies sexaginta. Inter eos dies trinis nundinis continuis ad praetorem in comitium producebantur, quantaeque pecuniae iudicati essent, praedicabatur.

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