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part. From Reliquiæ Wottoniana; also printed in Davison's Poet. ical Rhapsody, 1602.

PAGE 672, No. 666 Glide soft, ye silver floods. From Britannia's Pastorals, 1616, Bk. II., Song i., lines 242-280. This song is a tribute to the memory of William Ferrar, third son of Nicholas Ferrar, an eminent London merchant, who was interested in the adventures of Hawkins, Drake, and Raleigh, and brother of the well-known Nicholas Ferrar (1592-1637), of Little Gidding, in Huntingdonshire. He died young at sea.

Wither introduces him, under the pastoral name of " Alexis,” in The Shepherd's Hunting Line 4, Let no bird sing: Keats was evidently well acquainted with Browne's poetry; witness how excellently he uses this line in La Belle Dame Sans Merci.

PAGE_674, No. 667 - Glories, pleasures, pomps, delights and ease. From The Broken Heart, 1633.

PAGE 674, No. 668 --Come, you whose loves are dead. From The Knight of the Burning Pestle, 1613.

PAGE 675, No. 669 Oh no more, no more, too late. From The Broken Heart, 1633.

Page 675, No. 670 — Can we not force from widow'd Poetry. For absolute sincerity of feeling for bereavement that is more religious than personal this Elegy is, perhaps, , equalled or sure passed by only two in the language - Tennyson's In Memoriam, and Whitman's When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloom'd. I do not in the least wish to diminish the glory that haloes Shelley's Adonais, Arnold's Thyrsis, or Swinburne's Ave Atque Vale, but after all, is it not three-fourths art, and but one-fourth the mar, which keeps these things singing in men's memories? In the case of Carew, Tennyson, and Whitman, the man's life whose death they celebrate stands forth as the manifestation of their great virtues, giving a form to art. Who the dead man was, we do not, we can not forget. Whatever is of elusiveness in either Carew's, Tennyson's, or Whitman's elegy, is that of human nature, which after all is something greater than art.

Donne died March 31, 1631. Carew's poem was first published in the first edition of Donne's Works, 1633. Of this elegy Prof. Saintsbury writes (History of Elizabethan Literature, 1887): “ By this last (the Elegy) the reproach of vain and amatorious trilling which has been often levelled at Carew is at thrown back and blunted. No poem shows so great an influence on the masculine panegyrics with which Dryden was to enrich the English of the next generation, and few are fuller of noteworthy phrases, The splendid epitaph which closes it .. is only the best passage, not the only good one, and it may be matched with a fine and just description of English, ushered by a touch of acute criticism (Thou shalt yield to their soft melting phrases).

And it is the man who could write like this that Hazlitt calls an ele. gant court trifler.'' Line 4, Dough-baked: This ugly word is Bonne's. Cf. His Letter to the Lady Carey and Mistress Esses Rich, from Amiens:

In dough-baked men some harmlessness we

so

once

see.

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Cf.

Line 25, The Muses' garden, with pendantic weeds, etc.:
Donne's Letter to Mr. Rowland Woodward :

So affects my muse now, a chaste fallowness,
Since she to few, yet to too many hath shown,
How love-song weeds and satiric thorns are grown
Where seeds of better arts were early sown.

CORSERIS, corselet, encircling. CORAL, a toy made of coral, usu

ally with the addition of bells. CORDIWIN, Spanish leather made

originally at Cordova. CORONEMUS Nos Rosis ANTE

QUAM MARCESCANT, Let us
crown ourselves with roses

before they wither.
Couth, could.
CRAMASIE, crimson cloth.
CRAMPIS, to champ.
CRANK, sprightly.
CUTTED, curt.

DAUPHIN, dolphin,
Dazie, dais, daisy.
DECORE, decorate.
Deid, death.
DIAPRED, decorated.
Dichtis, make ready.
DINGS, slaps.
Dois, does.
Doxy, a mistress.
DRERIMENT, drear.
DUCDAME, bring him

to

me

GLOSSARY

A · FORROW,

before.
AGGRATE, please.
AMANTIUM IRAE, Lovers' quar-

rels.
AMATE, confound, dismay.
AssoiLE, absolve.
AT, as.
A - TEENDING, kindling.
ATTONCE, at once.
AULFE, a changeling.
BAIRN, a child.
BALE, woe.
BALK, a strip of ground left

unploughed.
BALLATING, making ballads.
Bauzon, a badger.
BELAPPIT, enveloped, enfolded.
BENE, are.
BEWIS, bows.
Bin, are.
BIRTH, kind.
BLONKIS, poetic word for horse.
BOULDEN, swollen.
Bowster, bolster.
BRANDONS, torches.
BRERE, briar.
Busk, dress up.

(Hanmer).

Echone, each one.
EMPERY, absolute dominion.

CANKER, worm.
Carpe Diem, Seize the oppor-

tunity.
CARRIER, course.
Cessile, ceasing, yielding.
CHAMPIAN, open country.
CHEVISAUNCE, a wall flower.
CHough, jackdaw.
CLEPED, called.
ClOggit, clogged.
COCKERS, a kind of rustic high

shoe.
Coil, confusion or tumult.
COINTREE, obs. form of Coven.

tree, kind of thread.

FEATER, neater.
FeaTOUSLY, neatly, adroitly.
Feidis, feeds.
Fere, companion, comrade.
FIRE - DRAKE. a fiery dragon of

mythical Germany.
FIRTH, park.
FLITTIS, cast, thrown,
Flos FLORUM, Flower of flowers.
FORTUNATI NIMIUM, Only too

happy.
FRANZY, frenzy.
FRIEKIS, warriors.

Low, flame.
LUBRICAN, obs. form of lepre.

chaun, a pigmy sprite. LYTHE, light.

a

MAIKIS, mates.
MAKE, mate.
MARCH - PINE, usually spelled

marchpane, a kind of sweet
biscuit usually composed of

almonds and sugar. MARVIS, well-known thrush

Gars, causes.
GARTH, garden.
Glow FFIN, stare.
Gowans, daisies.
GRAFFED, grafted.
GREETS, great.
GRUTCH, grudge.
GRYDE, horrified.

HAIRTIS, hart or red deer, hearts.
Handsel, earnest money.
HALD, hold.
HARLOCK, a flower not identified.
HEBEN, ebon.
HEILL, obs. form of hele, sal.

vation.
Hight, called, named.
HINDIS, female of red deer.
HIPS AND

HAWS, fruit of wild
rose and hawthorn.
HOWP, hope.
HURCHONIS, hedgehogs.
Hyd, skin.

IN DIE NATIVITATIS, On the Day

of Nativity. INGENRIT, born. IN IMAGINE PERTRANSIT HOMO,

Man passes into the shadow. IN OBITUM M. S., X. Mais,

1614 - 1667, On death of M.

S., May 10, 1614-1667.
INTEGER VITAE, Blameless in life.
INVART, inward.
JASPIS, jasper.
KNAP, to break.
KIRK, church.

common in Europe.
Mazer, drinking cup.
MELITOE, melilot (?), sweet

clover.
MELLING, mingling.
MENE, moan.
MERLE, common European black-

bird.
MICKLE, much.
MINIVERE, a kind of fur.
MISPRISION, contempt.
MISERRIMUS, Most wretched.
Moly, a fabulous herb of magic

power.
NAPPY, heady.
NEARE, near.
N'OSEREZ - VOUS,

MON BEL AMI,
Wilt thou not dare, my beau-

tiful friend. Nox Nocti INDICAT SCIENTIAM,

Night unto night showeth

knowledge.
O CRUDELIS AMOR, Oh Cruel

Love.
OFFUSKIT, obscured.
OUER, over.
OURHAILIT, overspread.
OXTER, a hug with the arms.
PADDOCK, toad or frog.
PAIRLY, mate.
PALMER, Pilgrim returning from

the Holy Land.
PARCAE, The Three Fates.
PARI JUGO DULCIS TRACTUS,

Sweet_drawing in equal yoke.
PARDY, By God.
PAUNCE, obs. form of pansy.
Peat, pet.
PERIGALL, adequate, worthy.
PERSEVER, persevere.
PRELUCÍAND, brightly shining.
PRICKET, a buck in his second

year.

Lady - cow, lady bug.
LAIF, something left behind.
LAMPIs, to go quickly.
Lairn, learn.
LEESE, lose.
Leir, "live.
LEIR, lore.
LEVIN, lightning.
LIEVER, rather.
LICHTER, lighter.
LICHTLIE, to make giddy.
LIMBECK, alembic.
Lin, desist from.
LINGEL, waxed thread.
LITHER, supple.
LIVES, lively.
LOKE, Aeece of wool.

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