Human Nature and Historical Knowledge: Hume, Hegel and Vico

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 18, 2002 - Philosophy - 244 pages
This book presents a study of the nature and conditions of historical knowledge, conducted through a study of the relevant theories of Hume, Hegel and Vico. It is usually thought that in order to establish historical facts, we have to have a theory of human nature to support our arguments. Hume, Hegel and Vico all subscribed to this view, and are therefore discussed in detail. Professor Pompa goes on to argue that there is in fact no way of discovering anything about human nature except through historical investigation. It is necessary therefore to find a different way of thinking about how we discover historical facts. This is done in the last chapter where, in opposition to almost all present views, it is argued that we must have a framework of inherited knowledge before we can believe in anything which results from historical enquiry.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
13
IV
17
V
23
VI
34
VII
42
VIII
49
IX
57
X
59
XXIV
130
XXV
133
XXVI
142
XXVII
147
XXVIII
152
XXIX
159
XXX
169
XXXI
175

XI
62
XII
65
XIII
67
XV
69
XVI
71
XVII
86
XVIII
92
XIX
99
XX
103
XXI
107
XXII
117
XXIII
126
XXXII
182
XXXIII
189
XXXIV
192
XXXV
194
XXXVI
196
XXXVII
205
XXXVIII
213
XXXIX
219
XL
224
XLI
227
XLII
231
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information