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BARNABE BARNES.

AND

THE following work by this ancient English Poet is incorrectly mentioned by Ritson. The copy from which my account is taken was in the valuable Collection of Bishop Dampier. « PARTHENOPHIL

PARTHENOPHE. Sonnettes, Madrigals, Elegies and Odes.

To the Right Noble and Vertuous Gentleman M. William Percy, Esquier, his deerest friend.”

The Printer's name, and date of the book are torn off, but on the next leaf there is

“ To the learned Gentlemen Readers, The Printer,” in which address is the date of, " May, 1593."

These sonnettes, Madrigals, &c. are comprehended in 146 pages, to which are subjoined, in manuscript, pages 147, 148, 149, 150; and the following six printed Sonnets, viz. to Henry, Earle of Northumberland; Roberte, Earle of Essex ; Henry, Earle of Southampton; Marie, Countesse of Pembrooke ; the Lady Straunge; and the Lady Brigett Manners; to the last of which, is this subscription :

“ Your Bewties inost affectionate servant,

Barnabe Barnes."

Then Then follows " A Table for to finde the Sonnettes, Madrigalles, &c.”

In the Sonnet to the Earl of Northumberland, the Author represents his Muse“ blushing at her first entrance."

In the Sonnet to the Earl of Essex, he calls his work “his First borne Babe," and makes similar allusions in the Sonnets to the other noble personages above specified.

It will be seen, by referring to Ritson's Bib. liographia Poetica, that Barnes, at least according to Ritson's account, had published nothing · so early as this work. Ritson knew nothing of this performance, neither is it mentioned by Antony Wood, nor indeed do I know where another

copy

is to be found. I select a Sonnet, by way of specimen, from p. 45. It is inscribed “ Sonnet LxvI.” and is addressed to Content.

Ah sweet Content where is thy mylde abode?

Is it with shepheards and light harted swaynes,
Which sing upon the dounes, and pype abroade,
Tending their flockes, and calleth on to playnes ?

Ah sweet Content, where doest thou safely rest?

In heaven with angels, which the prayses sing
Of him that made and rules at his behest
The mindes and parts of every living thing.

AL

Ah sweet Content, where doth thine harbour hold?

Is it in churches with religious men,
Which please the Goddes with prayers manifold,

And in their studies meditate it then.
Whether thou dost in heaven or earth appeare,
Be where thou will, thou will not harbour here.

Many of these Sonnets, as remarked before, are inscribed to the most distinguished personages of the time ; for example, “ To Henry, Earle of Southampton; The most vertuous, learned and bewtifull Ladie Marie, Countesse of Pembrooke; To the right vertuous and most bewtifull Lady, the Lady Straunge ; The Lady Brigett Manners.”

TUSSER.

A Hundreth good Pointes of Husbandries. Imprinted at London, in Flete Strete, within

Temple Barre, at the Signe of the Hand and Starre, by Richard Titler, the Third Day of February. An. 1557.

I MENTIONED in my first volume the extreme rarity of this edition, of which the Museum copy is the only one I have ever seen. On farther examination, it appears to contain some

singularities,

Then follows “A Table for to finde the Sonnettes, Madrigalles, &c.”

In the Sonnet to the Earl of Northumberland, the Author represents his Muse“ blushing at her first entrance."

In the Sonnet to the Earl of Essex, he calls his work “his First borne Babe," and makes similar allusions in the Sonnets to the other noble personages above specified.

It will be seen, by referring to Ritson's Bib. liographia Poetica, that Barnes, at least according to Ritson's account, had published nothing so early as this work. Ritson knew nothing of this performance, neither is it mentioned by Antony Wood, nor indeed do I know where another copy is to be found. .

I select a Sonnet, by way of specimen, from p. 45. It is inscribed “Sonnet Lxvi.” and is addressed to Content.

Ah sweet Content where is thy mylde abode?

Is it with shepheards and light harted swaynes,
Which sing upon the dounes, and pype abroade,
Tending their flockes, and calleth on to playnes?

Ah sweet Content, where doest thou safely rest?

In heaven with angels, which the prayses sing
Of him that made and rules at bis behest
The mindes and parts of every living thing.

Ah

Ah sweet Content, where doth thine harbour hold?

Is it in churches with religious men,
Which please the Goddes with prayers manifold,

And in their studies meditate it then.
Whether thou dost in heaven or earth appeare,
Be where thou will, thou will not harbour here.

Many of these Sonnets, as remarked before, are inscribed to the most distinguished personages of the time; for example,

“ To Henry, Earle of Southampton; The most vertuous, learned and bewtifull Ladie Marie, Countesse of Pembrooke; To the right vertuous and most bewtifull Lady, the Lady Straunge ; The Lady Brigett Manners.”

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TUSSER.

A Hundreth good Pointes of Husbandries. Imprinted at London, in Flete Strete, within

Temple Barre, at the Signe of the Hand and Starre, by Richard Titler, the Third Day of February. An. 1557.

I MENTIONED in my first volume the extreme rarity of this edition, of which the Museum copy is the only one I have ever seen. On farther examination, it appears to contain some

singularities,

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