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is in Verse; of which the reader will proli

be glad to see a specimen. It begins thus : -2rure dore y Consydrynge well

, most godly Kyng This desication

The zeale and perfecte loue : priato in Shillis bly Lean " Your grace doth beare to eche good thynge

That geuen is from aboue.

Sept last

+ /.

And that your grace, oft tymes doth looke

To learne of the last daye :
The whiche ye fide, with in Gods booke

That wyll not passe alwaye.
Whose boke is geuen, in these your dayes,

Wherein ye do reioyce:
And eke prayse hym, in al his wayes

And that with thankeful voyce. &c.

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The version of the history is no less homely than this Address to the King.

In the former treatyse to thee

Deare frende Theophilus :
I have written the verite

Of the Lorde Christe Jesus.

Whiche he to do, and eke to teache

Began untyll the daye :
In which the sprite up dyd hym feache

To dwell aboue for

aye.

After that he had power to do

Even by the holy ghost :
Commaundements then he gaue unto

His chosen least & most.

The whole is printed in black letter, and is carried through the first fourteen chapters of

the

.published i

the Acts. The music is in four parts, Meane, Countertenor, Tenor, and Bass. This curious book is in the possession of the Rev. Henry White of Lichfield.

In the same volume is bound up a selection from the Psalms, versified by Francis Seagar, of the same date. It is dedicated, in metre also, to “ the ryght honorable lorde Russell.” These have also Music with them, in four parts.

Since the first edition of this work I have discovered, that the Acts of the Apostles by Dr. Tye are described in Sir John Hawkins's History of Music, vol. iii. p. 253, and are mentioned in An Ishankan an old Comedy of Rowley’s there cited, called mitte ny teen's " When you see me you know me.”

pt 1887. It is in the Garrick Collection.

Sir John has also given a specimen of the Music, in modern notes, in four parts. They were sung,

he

says, in the Chapel of Edward VI. and probably in other places where Church service was performed; but the success of them not answering the expectation of their Author, he applied himself to another kind of study, the composing of music to words selected from the Psalms of David, in four, five, and more parts, to which species of harinony, for want of a better, the name of Anthem, a corruption of Antiphon, was given. P. 258.

It should seem from this passage, that Sir John considers Dr. Tye as the inventor of the Anthem. B b 2

SIR

SIR JOIN HARRINGTON.

SOME readers may be inclined to express surprize at the seeming want of regularity i.r these pages, and that articles which ought to follow one another as descriptions of works by the same author, or from similar subjects being discussed, are often widely separated. The reason is, that the rare books here exhibited are not of every day's occurrence, that accident has thrown in my way curious publications by the same author, or on similar subjects, at different periods of my work; besides this, as an act of atrocious villany perpetrated on the property of the Museum, by a Visitor with which the public are well acquainted, has been the means of depriving me of the source from which I drew' most largely, I have been compelled to drink at smaller, though not less pellucid and refreshing, streams, and, in short, to obtain the means of fulfilling my engagements where I could find them.

The volume hereafter described is the property of Mr. Isaac Reed: it is of most extraordinary rarity, and particularly curious as having been Sir John Harrington's own copy of a work which procured bin the displeasure of his Royal

Mistress;

Mistress; and above all, as being distinguished by his own manuscript notes.

The volume contains three Tracts by the same author.

1. " A NEW DISCOURSE OF A STALE SUBJECT, CALLED THE METAMORPHOSIS OF AJAX.

Written by MISACMOs to his friend and cosin PHILOSTILPNOS.

At London. Printed by Richard Field, dwelling in the Blackfriers.

1596.”

At the bottom of the title page Sir John has written, in red ink,

" Seen and dissalowed."

The dedication is also in manuscript by the author, and is as follows:

" To the Right Worshipfull

Thomas Markham,
Esquyre, this

bee d. d. I will not say moche to you in the beginning of my booke, becaus I have sayd perhaps more then enough of you in the end. I

pray you to take yt well for I doubt not but some wyll take yt ill, but yf they doe yt will be because they doe ill understand yt: yo' interest Bb 3

is

SIR JOHN HARRINGTON.

SOME readers may be inclined to express surprize at the seeming want of regularity in these pages, and that articles which ought to follow one another as descriptions of works by the same author, or from similar subjects being discussed, are often widely separated. The reason is, that the rare books here exhibited are not of every day's occurrence, that accident has thrown in my way curious publications by the same author, or on similar subjects, at different periods of my work; besides this, as an act of atrocious villany perpetrated on the property of the Museum, by a Visitor with which the public are well acquainted, has been the means of depriving me of the source from which I drew'most largely, I have been compelled to drink at smaller, though not less pellucid and refreshing, streams, and, in short, to obtain the means of fulfilling my engagements where I could find them.

The volume hereafter described is the property of Mr. Isaac Reed: it is of most extraordinary l'arity, and particularly curious as having been Sir John Harrington's own copy of a work which procured bin the displeasure of his Royal

Mistress;

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