The History of Henry Fielding, Volume 2

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Yale University Press, 1918 - Authors, English
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Page 127 - Which lives as long as fools are pleased to laugh. Some, valuing those of their own side or mind, Still make themselves the measure of mankind: Fondly we think we honour merit then, When we but praise ourselves in other men.
Page 329 - H. Fielding has given a true picture of himself and his first wife in the characters of Mr. and Mrs. Booth, some compliments to his own figure excepted ; and I am persuaded, several of the incidents he mentions are real matters of fact.
Page 305 - On the contrary (said he), you may observe there is always something which she prefers to truth. Fielding's Amelia ' was the most pleasing heroine of all the romances (he said) ; but that vile broken nose never cured, ruined the sale of perhaps the only book, which being printed off betimes one morning, a new edition was called for before night.
Page 129 - TO THE COUNTESS OF BUTE. Venice, Oct. 1, NS 1748. MY DEAR CHILD, I HAVE at length received the box, with the books enclosed ; for which I give you many thanks, as they amused me very much. I gave a very ridiculous proof of it, fitter indeed for my grand-daughter than myself. I returned from a party on horseback ; and after having rode twenty miles, part of it by moonshine, it was ten at night when I found the box arrived. I could not deny myself the pleasure of opening it : and, falling upon Fielding's...
Page 165 - ... fine park, composed of very unequal ground, and agreeably varied with all the diversity that hills, lawns, wood, and water, laid out with admirable taste, but owing less to art than to nature, could give. Beyond this, the country gradually rose into a ridge of wild mountains, the tops of which were above the clouds.
Page 177 - I am sure if I had seen a ghost, I should have looked in the very same manner, and done just as he did. And then to be sure, in that scene, as you called it, between him and his mother, where you told me he acted so fine, why any man, that is, any good man, that had such a mother, would have done exactly the same.
Page 228 - Bathurst t'other night carried a servant of the latter 's, who had attempted to shoot him, before Fielding; who, to all his other vocations, has, by the grace of Mr. Lyttelton, added that of Middlesex justice. He sent them word he was at supper, that they must come next morning.
Page 169 - When I mention religion, I mean the Christian religion ; and not only the Christian religion, but the Protestant religion ; and not only the Protestant religion, but the Church of England.
Page 105 - In like manner the excellence of the mental entertainment consists less in the subject, than in the author's skill in well dressing it up. How pleased therefore will the reader be to find, that we have, in the following work, adhered closely to one of the highest principles of the best cook which the present age, or perhaps that of Heliogabalus, hath produced...
Page 131 - In comparing those two writers, he used this expression ; " that there was as great a difference between them as between a man who knew how a watch was made, and a man who could tell the hour by looking on the dial-plate.

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