The Poetical Works, with The Virtuoso: A Fragment, Never Before Published, and The Life of the Author

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W. Suttaby and C. Corrall, 1807 - 239 pages
 

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Page 25 - O man ! does this capacious scene With half that kindling majesty dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of Caesar's fate, Amid the crowd of patriots ; and his arm Aloft extending, like eternal Jove When guilt brings down the thunder, call'd aloud On Tully's name, and shook his crimson steel, And bade the father of his country hail ? For lo ! the tyrant prostrate on the dust, And Rome again is free...
Page 18 - The blue profound, and hovering round the Sun, Beholds him pouring the redundant stream Of light ; beholds his unrelenting sway Bend the reluctant planets to absolve The fated rounds of time. Thence far effused, She darts her swiftness up the long career Of devious comets ; through its burning signs Exulting measures the perennial wheel Of Nature, and looks back on all the stars, Whose blended light, as with a milky zone, Invests the orient.
Page xiv - From Heaven my strains begin; from Heaven descends The flame of genius to the human breast, And love and beauty, and poetic joy And inspiration. Ere the radiant Sun Sprang from the east, or 'mid the vault of night The Moon suspended her serener lamp ; Ere mountains, woods, or streams, adorn'd the...
Page 15 - Then liv'd the almighty One : then, deep retir'd In his unfathom'd essence, view'd the forms, The forms eternal of created things ; The radiant sun, the/ moon's nocturnal lamp, The mountains, woods, and streams, the rolling globe, And wisdom's mien celestial. From the first Of days, on them his love divine he fix'd, His admiration : till in time complete, What he admir'd and lov'd, his vital smile Unfolded into being.
Page xiv - Her sister Liberty will not be far. Be present all ye genii, who conduct The wandering footsteps of the youthful bard, New to your springs and shades : who touch his ear With finer sounds : who heighten to his eye The bloom of Nature, and before him turn The gayest, happiest attitude of things.
Page 17 - The wonderful, the fair. I see them dawn ! I see the radiant visions, where they rise, More lovely than when Lucifer displays His beaming forehead through the gates of morn, \To lead the train of Phoebus and the Spring.
Page 20 - Risen from the grave to ease the heavy guilt Of deeds in life conceal'd ; of shapes that walk At dead of night, and clank their chains, and wave The torch of hell around the murderer's bed.
Page 66 - The powers of man : we feel within ourselves His energy divine : he tells the heart, He meant, he made us to behold and love What he beholds and loves, the general orb Of life and being ; to be great like him, , Beneficent and active.
Page 17 - Omnipotent might send him forth, In sight of mortal and immortal powers, As on a boundless theatre, to run The great career of justice, to exalt His generous aim to all diviner deeds, To chase each partial purpose from his breast, And through the mists of passion and of sense, And through the tossing tide of chance and pain, To hold his course unfaltering, while the voice Of Truth and Virtue up the steep ascent Of Nature calls him to his high reward, 'The applauding smile of Heaven...

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