History of Greece: I. Legendary Greece. II. Grecian History to the Reign of Peisistratus at Athens, Volume 7

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J. Murray, 1855 - Greece
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Contents

AlkibiadÍsSokratÍsthe Sophists
48
He tries to bring Athens into alliance with Argos
57
Failure of the embassy of Nikias at SpartaAthens concludes
67
Movements of the Spartans and Argeians
72
CHAPTER LVI
84
Congress at Mantineia for peacethe discussions prove abortive
91
Approach of the invaders to Argos by different lines of march
97
Plans against Tegeathe Eleians return home
103
Gradation of command and responsibility peculiar to the Lacedś
109
Complete ultimate victory of the Lacedśmonians
116
Operations of Argeians Eleians c near Epidaurus
123
tardiness of Sparta
136
Relations of Athens with Perdikkas of Macedonia
142
Naval combat in the harbour of Syracusethe Athenians victo
144
Refusal of the Melians to submit
156
CHAPTER LVII
162
Exploits of Duketiushe is defeated and becomes the prisoner
168
Relations of Sicily to Athens and Spartaaltered by the quarrel
176
Second expedition under PythodŰrus
182
60
188
Displeasure of the Athenians against Eurymedon and his colleagues
190
AlkibiadÍs warmly espouses their cause and advises intervention
198
Reply of AlkibiadÍs
211
Large preparations made for the expedition
216
Abundance in the Athenian treasurydisplay of wealth as well
225
Alarm felt at the festival lest the Spartans should come in arms
228
Anxiety of the Athenians to detect and punish the conspirators
236
Departure of the armament from Peirśussplendour and exciting
243
32
245
Temper and parties in the Syracusan assembly
252
His general denunciations against the oligarchical youth were well
258
AlkibiadÍs at MessÍnÍNaxos joins the Athenians Empty dis
264
37
272
Belief of the Athenians in his informationits tranquillising effects
280
Total numbers captured
282
Approach of Gylippus is made known to Nikias Facility of pre
360
Gylippus surprises and captures the Athenian fort of Labdalum
368
Farther defences provided by Gylippus joining the higher part
374
Remarks upon the despatch of Nikias
386
CHAPTER LX
394
Gylippus surprises and takes Plemmyrium
401
Disadvantages of the Athenian fleet in the harbour Their naval
407
40
411
Danger of the Athenian armamentarrival of DemosthenÍs with
413
Partial success at firstcomplete and ruinous defeat finally
420
DemosthenÍs insists at least on removing out of the Great Harbour
426
Eclipse of the moonAthenian retreat postponed
432
Partial success ashore against Gylippus
437
The envoys are badly received at Athensangry feeling against
438
Exhortations of Nikias on putting the crews aboard
444
AlkibiadÍs stands forward as a partyleader His education
445
Renewed attacks of the Syracusansdefeat of the Athenian fleet
446
Longcontinued and desperate struggleintense emotiontotal
451
Retreat of the Atheniansmiserable condition of the army
457
Unaccountable inaction of Nikias
460
Continued conflictno progress made by the retreating army
465
84
472
Influence of the Corinthiansefforts of Gylippusboth the gene
478
Overconfidence in Nikias was the greatest personal mistake which
484
Athens dismisses her Thracian mercenariesmassacre at Myka
490
Energetic resolutions adopted by the AtheniansBoard of ProbŻli
497
AlkibiadÍs at Spartahis recommendations determine the Lace
505
Arrival of AlkibiadÍs at Chiosrevolt of the island from Athens
511
Dishonourable and disadvantageous conditions of the treaty
519
347
526
Pedaritus Lacedśmonian governor at Chiosdisagreement
538
Comparison of the second treaty with the first
545
Long inaction of the fleet at Rhodesparalysing intrigues of Tis
551
Appendix to Vol VII
567
Great energy and capacity of AlkibiadÍs in public affairshis reck

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Page 294 - Witnesses of such a character as not to deserve credit in the most trifling cause, upon the most immaterial facts, gave evidence so incredible, or, to speak more properly, so impossible to be true, that it ought not to have been believed if it had come from the mouth of Cato ; and upon such evidence, from such witnesses, were innocent men condemned to death and executed.
Page 479 - Demosthenes, amisso exercitu , a captivitate gladio et voluntaria morte se vindicat : Nicias autem, ne Demosthenis quidem exemplo , ut sibi consuleret , admonitus , cladem suorum auxit dedecore captivitatis.

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