Studies in Natural History: Exhibiting a Popular View of the Most Striking and Interesting Objects of the Material World

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Oliver & Boyd, 1830 - Natural history - 247 pages
 

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Page 84 - The moon shines bright : — In such a night as this, When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees, And they did make no noise ; in such a night, Troilus, methinks, mounted the Trojan walls, And sigh'd his soul toward the Grecian tents, Where Cressid lay that night.
Page 29 - Some drill and bore The solid earth, and from the strata there Extract a register, by which we learn That he who made it, and reveal'd its date To Moses, was mistaken in its age.
Page 30 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 34 - The earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.
Page 229 - Shortening his journey between morn and noon, And hurrying him, impatient of his stay, Down to the rosy west, but kindly still Compensating his loss with added hours Of social converse...
Page 30 - I don't know what I may seem to the world ; but, as to myself, I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 228 - Than those of age, thy forehead wrapt in clouds, A leafless branch thy sceptre, and thy throne A sliding car, indebted to no wheels, But urged by storms along its slippery way, I love thee all unlovely as thou seem'st, And dreaded as thou art...
Page 238 - And taught a brute the way to safe revenge. i would not enter on my list of friends (Though graced with polished manners and fine sense, * Yet wanting sensibility) the man Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm.
Page 136 - One appeared dead, and was held up by the tail, or claw, without exhibiting any signs of life. A second stood on its head, with its claws in the air. A third imitated a Dutch milkmaid going to market, with pails on her shoulders.
Page 218 - Aphis, that derives its nutriment from the roots of grass and other plants {Aphis radicun1); these it transports from the neighbouring roots, probably by subterranean galleries, excavated for the purpose, leading from the nest in all directions' ; and thus, without going out it has always at hand a copious supply of food. These creatures share its care and solicitude equally with its own offspring.

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