The Aftermath of Slavery: A Study of the Condition and Environment of the American Negro by William A. Sinclair. With an Introduction by Thomas Wentworth Higginson

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Small, Maynard, 1905 - African Americans - 358 pages
 

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Page 345 - Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea ; its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man. That slavery — •subordination to the superior race — is his natural and normal condition.
Page 12 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Page 27 - So nigh is grandeur to our dust, So near is God to man, When Duty whispers low, Thou must, The youth replies, I can...
Page 47 - I may add at this point that, while I remain in my present position, I shall not attempt to retract or modify the Emancipation Proclamation ; nor shall I return to slavery any person who is free by the terms of that proclamation, or by any of the acts of Congress.
Page 356 - Beneath whose awful Hand we hold Dominion over palm and pine — Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet Lest we forget — lest we forget ! The tumult and the shouting dies — The Captains and the Kings departStill stands Thine ancient Sacrifice.
Page 288 - Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord; He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored ; He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword : His truth is marching on.
Page 344 - The new Constitution has put at rest forever all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institutions — African slavery as it exists among us — the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution. Jefferson, in his forecast, had anticipated this, as the rock upon which the old Union would split.
Page 49 - More than a year of trial now shows no loss by it in our foreign relations, none in our home popular sentiment, none in our white military force — no loss by it anyhow or anywhere.
Page 344 - Constitution were, that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically. It was an evil they knew not well how to deal with; but the general opinion of the men of that day was, that, somehow or other, in the order of Providence, the institution would be evanescent and pass away.
Page 288 - In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, With a glory in his bosom that transfigures you and me : As he died to make men holy, let us...

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