The Economic Cottage Builder: Or, Cottages for Men of Small Means...

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Wanzer, McKim & Company, 1856 - Architecture, Domestic - 127 pages
 

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Page 21 - While I would condemn cellars and basements entirely, the common plan of building, in their absence, must be condemned also. The house being built above the surface of the earth, a space is left between the lower floor and the ground, which is even closer and darker than a cellar, and which becomes, on a smaller scale, the source of noxious emanations.
Page 15 - Dr. Rush informs us that, during the prevalence of the Yellow Fever in Philadelphia, those who occupied apartments in the third story were far less liable to attacks than those who resided lower. Any one who will pass frequently from a ground floor apartment, on a street or alley, to the third or fourth story, will satisfy himself of the great difference in the purity or impurity of the atmosphere, in the higher and lower localities. But while I would insist...
Page 22 - ... as the surrounding soil. If filled up with any clean material, a few inches above the surrounding earth, it would be better. A proper foundation being prepared, make your first floor by a pavement of brick, laid in hydraulic cement, upon the surface of the ground. Let the same be extended into your walls, so as to cut off the walls of your house with water-proof cement, from all communication with the moisture of the surrounding earth. Upon this foundation, build according to your fancy. Your...
Page 22 - ... to purposes of store-rooms, kitchen, etc., you will find that the dry apartments thus constructed are infinitely superior to the old basements and cellars. And if you place your sitting and sleeping rooms on the second and third floors, you will be as thoroughly exempt from local miasma as architecture can make you.
Page 22 - If filled up with any clean material a few inches above the eurronnding earth, it would be better. A proper foundation being prepared, make your first floor by a pavement of brick, laid in hydraulic cement upon the surface of the ground. Let the same be extended into your walls, so as to cut off the walls of your house with water-proof cement from all communication with the moisture of the surrounding earth. Upon this foundation build according to your fancy. Your lower floor will be perfectly dry...
Page 22 - By adopting this plan, your house will be dry and cleanly ; the atmosphere of your ground-floor will be fresh and pure ; you will be entirely relieved from that steady drain upon life, which is produced by basements and cellars ; and, if you appropriate the ground-floor to purposes of store-rooms, kitchen, etc., you will find that the dry apartments, thus constructed, are infinitely...
Page 21 - ... and darker than a cellar, and which becomes, on a smaller scale, the source of noxious emanations. Under-floor space should be abolished, as well as cellars and basements. The plan that I have adopted, with the most satisfactory success, to avoid all these evils, is the following : Let the house be built entirely above the ground ; let the lower floor be built upon the surface of the earth, at least as high as the surrounding soil. If filled up with some other material, a few inches above the...
Page 50 - Charles P. Dwyer, in The Economic Cottage Builder (1856), explained that "as it is customary in this country to carpet every room in the house, flooring need not be laid with a view to appearance." And it is interesting to note that many writers recommended ingrain carpet over Brussels or tapestry. Godey's Lady's Book in 1859 suggested to "moderate housekeepers, living within a thousand or twelve hundred a year...
Page 106 - ... close the lower opening and open the upper one. In the refrigerator in the garret I would place a quantity of ice daily, the cool air from which descending down the tubes, would enter the rooms and keep them at any requisite temperature. Thus, in the warmest days in summer, a refreshing coolness can be maintained at the daily expense of a little ice — the furnace in the cellar and the refrigerator in the attic reciprocating with each other.
Page 50 - Since Resinol has made its appearance they have lost their terror, and to it belongs the blue ribbon. Three cases of the first, two of the second, and one of the third ailments yielded readily, by the use of Resinol, to my own and patients' astonishment, after other remedies had been used in vain for some time.

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