A Poetical Translation of the Elegies of Tibullus: And of the Poems of Sulpicia, Volume 2

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A. Millar, 1759
 

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Page 235 - On Thracia's hills the Lord of War Has curb'd the fury of his car, And dropp'd his thirsty lance at thy command. Perching on the sceptred hand Of Jove, thy magic lulls the feather'd king With ruffled plumes, and flagging wing : Quench'd in dark clouds of slumber lie The terror of his beak, and lightnings of his eye.
Page 195 - And dreaded losses aggravate his pains ; He turns, with anxious heart and crippled hands, His bonds of debt, and mortgages of lands ; Or views his coffers with suspicious eyes, Unlocks his gold, and counts it till he dies.
Page 235 - Of evils, with immortal rest from cares ; Assuage the terrors of the throne of Jove ; And quench the formidable thunderbolt Of unrelenting fire.
Page 195 - To prefs the weary minutes flagging wings : New forrow rifes as the day returns, A fifter fickens, or a daughter mourns. Now kindred Merit fills the fable bier, Now lacerated friendfhip claims a tear. Year chafes year, decay purfues decay, Still drops fome joy from with'ring life away ; New forms arife, and...
Page 236 - With slacken'd wings, While now the solemn concert breathes around, Incumbent o'er the sceptre of his lord Sleeps the stern eagle, by the number'd notes, Possess'd, and satiate with the melting tone, Sovereign of birds. The furious god of war, His darts forgetting, and the winged wheels That bear him vengeful o'er the embattled plain, Relents, and soothes his own fierce heart to ease, Most welcome ease.
Page 27 - Gainst herds, his bow the' unskilful archer drew; Ah ! my pierc'd heart, an archer now too true ! Now herds may roam untouch'd ; 'tis Cupid's joy, The brave to vanquish, and to fix the coy. The youth...
Page 29 - Let those who always lov'd, now love the more. Now fair Dione to the myrtle grove Sends the gay Nymphs, and sends her tender Love. And shall they venture ? Is it safe to go, While Nymphs have hearts, and Cupid wears a bow...
Page 29 - And yet, ye nymphs, beware, his eyes have charms: And love that's naked, still is love in arms. Let those love now, who never loved before; And those who always loved, now love the more. From Venus' bower to Delia's lodge repairs A virgin train complete with modest airs: "Chaste Delia, grant our suit!
Page 29 - Cupid's joy, The brave to vanquish, and to fix the coy. The youth whose heart the soft emotion feels, Nor sighs for wealth, nor waits at grandeur's heels ; Age, fir'd by love, is touch'd by shame no more, But blabs its follies at the fair-one's door.
Page 211 - Not though, to drive suspicion from your breast, Or love's soft queen, or Juno she attest : No truth the women know ; their looks are Lies. Lover Yet Jove connives at amorous perjuries. Hence, serious thoughts! then why do I complain? The fair are licens'd by the gods to feign.

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